Mario Golf Super Rush: Complete Glossary, What the Terms and Lingo Mean

Here are all of the terms that you’ll encounter in Mario Golf: Super Rush, along with their definitions.


If you’re new to Mario Golf, or just golf in general, you may be wondering what some of the terms mean in the Super Rush game.

Most of the terms here are defined in Mario Golf: Super Rush in the Golf Guide section, under Golf Lingo, with some extras included. For quick and easy reference, though, you can find the full glossary of these terms below.


3 Wood (3W)

A club with more loft than a driver.

4 Wood (4W)

A club with more loft than a 3 wood.

5 Wood (5W)        

A club with more loft than a 4 wood.

Address

Taking a stance and preparing to hit the ball.


Against

Hitting a ball into the wind. Use a lower-numbered club or hit a lower shot than usual to compensate.

Albatross

A score of three strokes under par on a hole. Also called a “double eagle.”

All Square

When competitors in match play have won the same number of holes.


Alternate Shot

A golf competition format in which two players form a team and take turns hitting the same ball.

Amateur

A non-professional golfer.

Approach

Any shot aimed toward the green. Short approach shots often involve deftly reducing swing strength in order to get the ball close to the pin.

Approach Wedge (AW)

A wedge that provides accuracy on shorter shots. It falls between the pitching wedge and the sand wedge in terms of loft and distance.

Apron

A neatly mowed area between the fairway and the putting green.

Average

The average number of a set of statistics. The average of all of the scores from one round is called the average score.

Average Drive

Average distance of shots from the tree.

Average Putts

Average number of putts per hole.

Average Score

Average score per 18-hole round.

Back Nine

The final nine holes of a course. Also referred to as “in” – like, for example, on a scorecard.

Back Trees

The farthest-back and most difficult tees on a hole. Also called the championship tees, these tees are used almost exclusively for tournaments.

Backspin

A front-to-back spin on the ball that causes shots to rise, float, and stop quickly when they land.

Backswing

Taking the club back and away from the ball and up to the top of the swing.

Baffy

An old-timey name for a wooden club similar to a modern 4 wood.

Ball

The round, white object you hit with a club. Modern golf balls are made from rubber, but they used to be made from wood or leather.

Ball Mark

An indentation made when the ball hits the green.

Ball Marker

A small, flat object used to mark the position of a ball on the green.

Bare Ground

A lie where the grass is so thin or nonexistent that you’re basically hitting off raw dirt.

Battle Golf

A Mario Golf: Super Rush game mode in which players fight over nine holes on one course, all at the same time. The first to three flags wins, and players can use the Mii characters that they compete with in Golf Adventure.

Beach Bunker

A bunker next to a water hazard.

Best Drive

Your longest tee shot ever.

Best Gross

Best total score on a given course before factoring in handicap. A true measure of a golfer’s skill.

Best Score

Your lowest number of strokes ever taken on a full round.

Birdie

Completing a hole in one stroke less than par.

Birdie Average

The percentage of birdies made out of the total holes played.

Birdie Break

Scoring anything better than birdie on a hole. In other words, to break birdie, you need an eagle, albatross, or hole in one!

Birdie-Break Rate

The rate at which golfers score better than a birdie. This number represents a golfer’s rate of making eagles, albatrosses, and holes in one.

Blast

Hitting the ball out of a bunker or other hazard in an explosion of sand or dirt. If executed correctly, the club won’t actually make contact with the ball. Sand wedges have a sole specifically designed to add bounce, which prevents the club from digging into the ground, making them specifically designed for this type of shot.

Blind

A lie from which it’s impossible to see the green or pin.

Blow-Up Hole

Any hole where a player makes several bad shots, leading to a disappointing, disastrous score.

Bogey

A score of one stroke over par on a hole.

Bounce

A feature of certain clubs, like sand wedges, in which the sole is designed to stop the club from digging into the ground too much, making it easier to hit the ball out of bunkers and other tricky lies.

Bounce Back

Following up a bogey or worse on a hole with a birdie or better on the next.

Break Par

Scoring under par on a hole or round.

Bump and Run

A low chip shot that maximises roll.

Bunker

A hazard full of and that’s also called a sand trap.

Caddie

A person that helps golfers by carrying their clubs and offering shot advice and moral support.

Caddie Master

Someone in charge of a golf course’s caddies and other related duties.

Carry

The distance a shot travels from where the ball is struck until it first touches the ground.

Cavity Back

A type of iron with a hollow backside and thicker edges, which give it a larger sweep spot. The design takes away some distance but makes it easier to hit decent shots.

Championship Tees

The farthest-back and most difficult tees on a hole. These tees are used almost exclusively for tournaments.

Chip

A short approach shot that lofts the ball onto the green and allows it to roll toward the hole.

Chip In

Chipping the ball into the hole from off the green.

Cleek

An old-timey metal club with low loft similar to a modern 1-iron.

Closest to the Pin

A competition to see who can hit their tee shot closest to the pin on a par 3.

Club

The thing you hit a golf ball with.

Club Champion

The winner of a golf club’s championship tournament.

Club Championship

A golf club’s championship tournament.

Club Number

The number on the sole of a clubhead. Bigger numbers have a great angle of loft, resulting in shots that fly higher and travel a shorter distance.

Club Set

A set of golf clubs. The maximum number of clubs allowed in a round is 14 (using less than 14 is fine).

Clubface

The front grooved surface of a clubhead used to strike the ball.

Clubhead

The part of the club used to hit the ball.

Clubhouse

A golf club’s main building. Usually has a lounge, a locker room, and so on.

Clutch Putt

Sinking an important putt, such as one that wins a tournament.

Collar

The edge of the green.

Competitive Golf

Competing against other golfers in tournaments and other types of organised matches.

Concede

When a player in a match-play competition decides that they’re unlikely to win a hole and gives up, awarding the hole to their opponent.

Course

The venue where golf is played, usually comprising 18 holes: a front nine and back nine. On most courses, even par is 72.

Course Layout

The shape of a golf course, including the location of each hole, water hazard, sand trap, and green.

Course Management

Making wise decisions on each shot in order to optimise one’s score on each hole.

Course Rating

A course’s difficulty expressed as the expected average good score for a scratch player (a player capable of shooting even par with a handicap of zero). A course rated 73, for example, is more difficult than one rated 71.

Creek

A water hazard that flows through a course or hole. Landing in one will result in a one-stroke penalty.

Cross Bunker

A bunker that cuts across the fairway.

Cup

Another name for the hole on the green, which usually has a plastic cup inside of it. The cup holds the flagstick (or “pin”), which allows the hole’s location to be seen from a distance.

Dead Aim

Aiming at your target with laser-like focus.

Deep Rough

Grass that’s longer and thicker than standard rough and even harder to hit the ball out of. Also called heavy rough.

Defending Champion

The golfer who won a tournament the last time it was played.

Dimples

The indentations on a golf ball. Dimples help control spin and reduce air resistance.

Divot

A chunk of grass and dirt dug out of the ground by the club after striking the ball.

Divot Tool

A tool used to fix ball marks on the green.

Dogleg

A golf hole featuring a fairway that turns sharply between the tee and the green. The overall shape is reminiscent of a dog’s leg, hence the name.

Dormie

When a competitor in match play is ahead by the number of holes left to play. This means the match can be won with a tie on any of the remaining holes.

Dormie Hole

In match play, a hole on which the match can be won with a tie.

Double Bogey

A score of two strikes over par on a hole.

Double Eagle

A score of three strokes under par on a hole. Also called an albatross.

Double Par

A score on a hole equal to twice par.

Double Peoria

A method of determining handicaps by scoring players on 12 secret holes over an 18-hole round. This can be exciting, as it gives everyone a chance at first place. To calculate handicaps, a golfer’s score on the secret holes is multiplied by 1.5. Then the total par for those holes is subtracted, and the result is multiplied by 0.8.

Downhill

When the ground slopes downward.

Downswing

Bringing the club down from the top of the swing back toward the ball.

Draw

A shot that intentionally curves from right to left for right-handed people and left to right for left-handed people.

Dribbler

A short shot that bounces along the ground in a series of small hops. Usually, the result of topping the ball.

Drive

A long-distance shot hit from the tree, usually using a driver.

Driver (D)

The club with the lowest loft and longest distance.

Drives-in-Fairway Rate

The percentage of holes on which a golfer’s tee shot lands on the fairway (not including a par 3).

Driving Range

A facility where golfers can practice a variety of shots.

Drop

Dropping a ball in a playable area after hitting into a hazard or unplayable lie.

Duff

Hitting the ground behind the ball before hitting the ball, usually resulting in a very short mishit.

Eagle

A score of two strokes under par on a hole.

Eagle Average

The percentage of eagles made out of total holes played.

Edge

The edge of the green, the edge of a bunker, or the bottom edge of a clubface.

Even

A score of par on a hole or round.

Fade

A shot that intentionally curves from left to right for right-handed people and right to left for left-handed people.

Fairway

The long stretch of short grass between the tee and green.

Fairway Bunker

A bunker located in or along a fairway.

Fairway Wood

Woods such as a 3 wood or 5 wood with more loft than a driver that can be used to hit the ball a long way from the fairway or to tee off when a shorter drive is desired.

Finish

The end of the follow-through after hitting the ball.

First Tee

The teeing area on the first hole of a golf course.

Flag

The pole with a flag at the top that marks the hole on the green. Also called the flagstick or pin.

Flagstick

The pole with a flag at the top that marks the hole on the green. Also called the flag or pin.

Flat Swing

A swing plane that’s more horizontal than vertical.

Flier

A shot that flies farther than intended due to low backspin. Usually the result of grass or moisture between the clubface and ball upon impact.

Flight Path

The trajectory of a shot.

Follow-Through

The continuation of the swing after hitting the ball.

Fore!

A shout used by golfers to warn anyone within range that their shot is headed toward them.

Forfeit Hole

To give up n a hole. In Mario Golf: Super Rush, this results in a score of triple par.

Forged Iron

An iron club with a thin, solid head that has a smaller sweet spot than cavity-back irons but travels farther and feels buttery smooth when hit well.

Fried Egg

When the ball is half-buried in a bunker, resembling a fried egg. This type of lie can result from high-flying shots that fall straight down into the sand.

Fringe

The border around a green of slightly longer grass.

Front Nine

The first nine holes of a course. Also referred to as “out” – like, for example, on a scorecard.

Front Tees

The tees closest to the fairway on each hole.

Full Swing

A swing that uses a full backswing and follow-through.

General Area

Everywhere on a course except bunkers, penalty areas, teeing area, and putting green of the hole being played.

Gimme

A very short putt that some casual golfers will count as made without actually putting the ball into the hole.

Golf Adventure

A new game mode in Mario Golf: Super Rush, which acts as its campaign mode. The player uses their Mii character to complete challenges and story missions to level up and become a more dominant character.

Golf Bag

The bag used to hold a set of golf clubs and other equipment.

Golf Club

A place where golf is played.

Golf Shoes

Shoes with spikes or other traction on the soles specifically designed for playing golf.

Golfer

One who plays golf.

Gooseneck

A club with a bend in the hosel.

Grass Hazard

A grass-covered hollow in the ground, similar to a bunker. As it is not considered a true hazard, the rules allow a player to ground the club.

Green

The area of short grass surrounding the hole, upon which the ball is putted. Once on the green, a player may mark the ball’s position, then pick it up and clean it if so desired.

Green in Regulation

Reaching the green in two strokes less than par.

Greens-in-Regulation Rate

The percentage of holes on which a golfer reaches the green in regulation.

Greenside Bunker

A bunker located near the green.

Grip

How a club is held or the actual handle of the club.

Grooves

The lines etched into the face of a golf club that impart spin on the ball.

Gross

A player’s total score for a round before handicap is taken into consideration.

Handicap

The number of strokes subtracted from a player’s score to compare their round with a scratch golfer’s. A scratch golfer normally shoots even par and thus has a handicap of zero.

Heath

An area of untended land scattered with low bushes.

Heavy Rough

Grass that’s longer and thicker than standard rough and even harder to hit the ball out of. Also called deep rough.

Hole

The hole or “cup” on each green. The objective of golf is to get the ball into this. Hole also refers to each tee to green on a course, such as hole 1.

Hole Out

Getting the ball into the hole.

Hole in One

Hitting the ball into the hole in one strike.

Home Hole

The last hole on a golf course. Once it’s done, you’re on your way home!

Honours

Who hits first off each tee is determined by honours. After the first hole, the player with the lowest score on the previous earns honours on the next hole.

Hook

A shot that unintentionally curves dramatically from right to left for right-handed people and left to right for left-handed people.

Hosel

The part of a golf club where the head connects to the shaft.

Hybrid

A club that can be swung like a long iron but offers the forgiveness and distance of a fairway wood.

Impact

The moment the club strikes the ball. The timing and angle of the clubface at impact determine a shot’s trajectory.

Impact Zone

The area in the swing in which the ball can be hit.

Inside-Out Swing

A swing that starts inside the target line and finishes outside of it, putting spin on the ball that causes shots or draw (or even hook).

Intentional

Shaping a shot left or right around an obstacle or hazard.

Iron

A metal club made from iron or steel and used in a variety of situations. Bigger numbers have a greater angle of loft, resulting in shots that fly higher and travel a shorter distance.

Island Green

A green completely surrounded by water.

Lay Up

A shot hit intentionally short of the green to reduce risk. It’s common to lay up on the second shot on a par 5 to avoid water or other trouble that a longer shot could bring into play.

Leading Edge

The bottom front edge of the clubface.

Lie

The position of the ball on the ground.

Line

The intended path of a putt.

Links

Traditionally a golf course on the coast with sandy, natural terrain. Commonly used nowadays as a synonym for course.

Lob

A shot that lofts the ball super high into the air.

Loft

The angle of the clubface. The greater the angle, the higher a shot will fly. Loft increases in order from driver to lob wedge.

Long Iron

An iron club used for long distances – usually the 2, 3, and 4. Irons used for short distances are called short irons (8-9), and irons used for medium distances are called long irons (5-7).

Long-Drive Contest

A competition to see who can hit their tee shot the farthest down the fairway on a given hole.

Lost Ball

A shot that can’t be found. Don’t worry – you can’t lose your ball in the Mario Golf: Super Rush game.

Match Play

A competition between two golfers to see who can win the most holes. The match ends when one competitor has won enough holes to secure victory.

Member

Someone who belongs to a golf club.

Mid Iron

An iron club used for medium distances – usually the 5, 6, and 7. Irons used for short distances are called short irons (8-9), and irons used for long distances are called long irons (2-4).

Mishit

A poorly hit shot that doesn’t go where intended.

Mound

A place where the ground rises like a tiny hill.

Mulligan

A free do-over after a poor shot. Not allowed in competitions, mulligans are a thing of casual, non-serious golf.

Net

A player’s gross, or overall, score minus their handicap. Net scores allow golfers of different abilities to compete with one another on a level playing field.

Network Play

A Mario Golf: Super Rush game mode in which players can compete against each other online or via local wireless play.

Obstacle

An object, such as a tree, that is between the ball’s lie and the pin. Encountering an obstacle is usually the result of a poor shot or bad planning.

On

When the ball comes to rest on the green. Reaching the green in two strokes is “on in two,” and so on. A nice shot to the green might be called a “nice on.”

Out of Bounds (OB)

Hitting the ball out of bounds (OB) usually results in a one-stroke penalty plus reattempting the shot from the original location. For example, if you hit your tee shot out of bounds, you would take a penalty stroke and re-hit from the tree, which would effectively become your third stroke.

Outdrive

Hitting a tee shot farther than another player, often setting up a better approach.

Outside-In Swing

A swing that starts outside that target line and finishes inside of it, putting spin on the ball that causes shots to fade (or even slice).

Over Par

Completing a hole or round in more strokes than par.

Pair

A team of two golfers.

Par

The standard number of strokes set for each hole. The total of par for each hole is considered par for the course.

Par Save

Scoring par on a hole without reaching the green in regulation.

Par-Break Rate

The percentage of holes on which a golfer breaks par.

Par-Save Rate

The percentage of holes on which a golfer saves par.

Partner

In competitive play, a golfer who sides with you on a doubles team. In casual play, one of the other golfers playing in your party.

Party

A group of up to four players playing a round of golf together.

Penalty Area

A defined area that is difficult to hit the ball out of. You can either attempt to play the ball where it lies or take relief and a one-stroke penalty.

Penalty Stroke

A stroke added to your score for hitting the ball out of bounds or into a hazard.

Pin

The pole with a flag at the top that marks the hole on the green. Also called the flagstick or flag.

Pitch

A short approach shot that lofts the ball high into the air and onto the green, then stops quickly without much roll.

Pitching Wedge (PW)

A wedge with less loft than both the approach wedge and the sand wedge.

Playoff

A tiebreaker if a match or tournament is tied after the last hole. Sudden death is the most common format, but some playoffs feature an additional three or even 18 holes.

Plus Handicap

A handicap awarded to expert players that is added to their score during handicap play. If a player has a gross score of 62 and a “plus 10” handicap, their net score would become 72.

Poley

A putt made from a distance longer than the flagstick.

Pot Bunker

A small, round, pot-shaped bunker often found in fairways and around the greens on links-style courses.

Private Course

A course where only members and their guests can play.

Public Course

A golf course that anyone can play without being a member.

Putt

Hitting the ball with the putter. Using the putter off the green doesn’t count as a putt stats-wise.

Putter

A flat club used to roll the ball across the green.

Putting

Hitting the ball with a putter on the green.

Rake

A tool used to smooth out the sand after playing a shot from a bunker.

Recovery

Hitting a good shot out of a bad situation.

Registration

The process of entering a golf tournament. Most events require players to register in advance.

Regular Tees

The tees used by most average golfers.

Rough

Longer grass bordering the fairway that is hard to hit good shots from.

Round

A complete game of golf, usually consisting of 18 holes.

Run

The distance a shot travels after the ball hits the ground. Carry plus run equals the total distance of a shot.

Running Approach

A shot where the ball is intentionally kept very low to the ground with little spin.

Sand Wedge (SW)

A wedge that has a greater loft than an approach wedge or pitching wedge, resulting in a shorter roll. It also has a sole designed to add bounce, making it ideal for blasting shots out of bunkers.

Sand-Save Percentage

The percentage of times a player gets the ball into the hole in two strokes or less from a greenside bunker.

Score

The number of strokes taken to complete a hole or round.

Scorecard

A card usually made of stiff paper used to record or tally scores during a round of golf.

Scrambling Rate

The rate at which a player makes par or better after not reaching the green in regulation.

Scratch Golfer

A golfer with a handicap of zero.

Shaft

The rod that connects a golf club’s head to its grip. Moder shafts are usually made of steel or graphite and have different amounts of flex.

Shank

A mishit in which the hosel contacts the ball rather than the clubface, resulting in a sideways shot.

Shoot Your Age

Completing an 18-hole round of golf with a score equal to or lower than one’s current age.

Short

An approach shot that doesn’t reach the green. This may result from poor club selection or a mishit.

Short Game

The aspect of golf that involves short-range shots, like wedge play, chips, and putts. A good short game is the key to consistently scoring well.

Short Iron

An iron used for short distances – usually the 8 and 9. Irons used from medium and long distances are called midirons (5-7) and long irons (2-4).

Short Rough

A strip of mid-length grass between the fairway and the rough.

Shortcut

A shot path that cuts across the bend of a dogleg rather than the safe route down the fairway.

Shot

The act of hitting a golf ball.

Shotmaker

A skilled golfer that can execute difficult shots.

Side Bunker

A bunker on either side of a fairway.

Sidespin

When the ball spins. If a right-handed player’s shot spins to the right, it will slice to the right. If it spins to the left, it will hook to the left.

Slice

A shot that unintentionally curves dramatically from left to right for right-handed people and right to left for left-handed people.

Slow Play

Playing golf very slowly. Slow play is considered poor etiquette and can result in a penalty during tournaments.

Sole

The bottom part of the clubhead that touches the ground.

Special Dash

A Special Dash drains stamina very quickly, but gives each character in Mario Golf: Super Rush a faster, more destructive method of dashing down the course.

Special Shot

The Mario Golf: Super Rush character will perform a special animation when they play the shot, which will be better than the standard shot.

Speed Golf

A Mario Golf: Super Rush game mode in which players need to hit the ball, chase it down, and finish each hole as quickly as they can. Each stroke adds 30 seconds to the player’s time.

Spike Marks

Marks on a green from the spikes of golf shoes.

 Spin

The rotation of the ball in flight, which can change its trajectory. It’s possible to impart topspin, backspin, or sidespin to the ball.

Spoon

An old-timey name for a 3 wood because the clubface was concave back in the day. Modern 3 woods have flat faces, but they are similar in terms of loft and use.

Stance

A golfer’s body position when addressing the ball.

Standard Golf

A Mario Golf: Super Rush game mode in which the lowest score wins.

Starter

The person who sets the order of play from the first tee and keeps a course flowing smoothly.

Stroke

Swinging the club with the intent of hitting the ball. Don’t whiff! If you swing and miss but were trying to hit the ball, it still counts as a stroke.

Stroke Play

Competing at golf by counting up the total number of strokes for each player. Lowest score wins!

Sudden Death

A type of tiebreaker in which victory is decided one extra hole at a time if a winner isn’t determined by the final hole.

Sway

Moving the body from side to side during a golf swing. Too much sway can cause erratic ball flight.

Sweet Spot

The area on the clubface where the ball should be struck I order to achieve ideal results.

Sweet-Spot Rate

The percentage of shots hit on the sweet spot.

Swing

The act of taking the club back and bringing it back down in a pendulum-like motion to hit the ball.

Tailwind

Wind blowing in the same direction as a shot, which can carry the ball farther than usual.

Takeaway

Taking the club back and away from the ball at the start of the backswing.

Tap-In

A very short, simple putt.

Teaching Pro

A trained instructor who teaches golfers the finer points of the game.

Tee

A small peg used to raise the ball off of the ground when teeing off. Also commonly used as shorthand for the teeing area.

Tee Box

A common term for the teeing area, which is in a rectangle behind the set of tee markers you’re playing from that is two club-lengths deep. Your first shot on each hole must be taken from within this space.

Tee Markers

Markers that define the teeing area on each hole, which is a rectangle behind each set of tee markers that’s the length of two clubs.

Tee Off

Hitting a golf ball from a tee. Often used to refer to the first shot on the first hole of a round of golf.

Tee Shot

The first shot on a hole taken from the tee.

Tee Up

Placing the ball on a tee.

Teeing Area

The place where you start each hole, defined by a rectangle behind the set of tee markers you’re playing from. Commonly referred to as the tee box or simply the tee. Your first shot on each hole must be taken from within this area.

The Top

The highest point in the golf swing where the backswing stops and the downswing starts.

The Turn

Moving on to the back nine after finishing the front nine. Often used in the expression “making the turn.”

The Yips

The inability to play well because of nerves. The yips are most commonly associated with putting.

Title Holder

A player that wins a championship tournament and therefore holds that particular title.

Top

When the club makes contact with the upper half of the ball, usually resulting in a short, low-flying mishit.

Topography

The layout and arrangement of the course’s features. Elevation is one of the key topographical features studied before golfers take a shot and can be examined with the Range and Elevation Finders in Mario Golf: Super Rush.

Topspin

A back-to-front spin on the ball that causes shots to drop sooner but roll farther.

Touch

An abstract term that refers to having a good feel or sensitivity for playing accurate golf shots.

Tournament

A competition among many golfers for a prize, trophy, or title.

Tournament Green

A green set-up to be more challenging than usual, specifically for tournaments.

Trajectory

The flight path of a shot.

Triple Bogey

A score of three over par on a hole.

Trouble Shot

When the ball lies in a difficult spot to hit out of, such as behind a tree of under a bush.

Under Par

Completing a hole or round in fewer strokes than par.

Undulation

The ups and downs of the various terrain on a golf course. Studying the undulation of greens can improve your putting.

Unplayable Ball

A ball that can’t be played because of where it lies. Taking relief in this situation is a one-stroke penalty.

Uphill

Any shot on an uphill slope. The ball may fly higher and travel less distance than on a flat lie.

Upright Swing

A swing plane that’s more vertical than horizontal.

Visitor

A guest playing at a golf club that they’re not a member of.

Waste Area

Terrain made up of sand and gravel that is often unmaintained. Like deep rough, these areas are difficult to hit out of.

Water Hazard

An area of water, such as a pond, present on a golf course. If a ball gets lost in a water hazard, the golfer has to drop the ball without moving closer to the hole and take a one-stroke penalty.

Wedge

A short-range club used to loft the ball into the air. Sand, pitching, and approach wedges are common in most sets of golf clubs.

Wet

A shot that lands in a water hazard.

Whiff

A swing that completely misses the ball.

Wire to Wire

Leading all rounds in a golf tournament and finishing with the win.

Wood

A long-range club traditionally made of wood but now usually made of metal. The driver (1 wood) is used to hit the ball the farthest, followed by the 3 wood, and so on.

Yard

A unit used to measure distance in golf. One yard is equal to three feet or 91.44 centimetres.

Those are all of the entries in the Mario Golf: Super Rush Golf Lingo section, as well as a few other terms used within the Nintendo Switch title.


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Ben Chopping

Will give almost any game a chance, particularly those that include wildlife, monsters, or prehistoric creatures of any kind.

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