MLB The Show 21: Biggest Stadiums to Hit Home Runs

Here are the largest ballparks, by dimensions, in MLB The Show 21 if you want a home run challenge.


MLB The Show 21 incorporates the 30 Major League stadiums as well as Minor League and historical stadiums. Unique to baseball is that each stadium has its own unique dimensions, as opposed to other sports where the field has uniform dimensions regardless of stadium.

When selecting a stadium to play in The Show, many factors can influence the decision: favorite team, hometown, notable memories, etc. This article will look at one main factor: the biggest ballparks, making it that much more challenging to hit home runs.


A smaller factor in consideration are any obstacles at play: awkward angles, high walls, etc. One of the ballparks listed has the shortest distances down either line in baseball, but one large, looming obstacle presents itself in left field.

While there are many stadiums to choose from, this list will focus only on currently used stadiums. This is to maintain consistency with another list on the ballparks with the shortest dimensions. However, if you want a challenge, most of these historical stadiums have larger dimensions and higher walls than current stadiums, making hitting homers a difficult endeavor.

The list will be in alphabetical order by stadium name with the name of the team that plays there in parentheses. Ballpark dimensions will be given in feet with the left field foul pole measurement first, then left-center, center, right-center, and right field foul pole.

1. Chase Field (Arizona Diamondbacks)

Dimensions: 330, 413, 407, 413, 334


While it is 374 to right-center and left-center, the highlight is the 413 just to the left and right of center as a challenge. Further, the high wall in center makes reaching 407 and 413 more difficult. The wall in dead center juts back a little. Beyond that, the walls are standard height, with the pool area in right center the main attraction of Chase Field.

2. Comerica Park (Detroit Tigers)

Dimensions: 345, 370, 420, 365, 330

Even though the center field wall was brought in 20 feet, center field at Comerica is still the longest distance home plate to outfield wall in the Majors. Ironically, other than center field, Comerica’s distances are right in the middle of the league, a little longer down the lines yet shorter to the gaps. There is a higher-than-average wall in right center that sticks out a bit, but the real challenge is reaching 421+ feet to dead center.


3. Coors Field (Colorado Rockies)

Dimensions: 347, 390, 415, 375, 350

The final in our triplet of Cs, Coors Field might be the largest park overall by dimensions. However, it has always played as a hitter’s park because of the thinner air in Denver, and the same dynamics translate to the game, which makes Coors Field an interesting conundrum. There are several challenges, including the high scoreboard in straightaway right field and the large clear planes of fiberglass that extend above the walls in right center where the bullpens are located. Hitting a homer to left-center with a left-handed hitter is difficult as well, and many balls may die here and end up as triples.

4. Fenway Park (Boston Red Sox)

Dimensions: 310, 379, 390, 420, 302

The ballpark alluded to in the intro, Fenway has the distinction of having the shortest lines and the deepest gap. The “Pesky Pole” in right and low wall make hooking a homer just inside the right field foul pole the shortest home run in the game (outside of an inside-the-park variety). However, the Green Monster spanning left and left-center fields stands over 37 feet tall. While this may mean some flyballs become homers, many hard-hit line drives may end up bouncing off the wall. Further, while it is 380 to right center, if you hit it into the triangle between center and right-center field, you will need to really muscle it out to hit a homer as it measures 420 feet!

5. Oracle Park (San Francisco Giants)

Dimensions: 339, 399, 391, 415, 309

Widely considered the most beautiful ballpark in the Majors, Oracle Park still presents many challenges even after the fences were moved in a few years ago. 309 is short to right field, but the arcade section is atop a 25-foot wall that also represents the out-of-town scoreboard at the foot of the wall. In real life, winds from the McCovey Cove make it more difficult to hit homers, but that does not always translate to the game. However, 415 represents Oracle Park’s famed “triples alley” where many balls die and become triples. The walls in right center that represent “triples alley” are also high and awkwardly angled, so you really have to mash into one with a power hitter to hit a homer in that area. Center field is also rare in that the gaps are deeper, so you are better off aiming for dead center than you are for the gaps.

For those The Show gamers wanting a challenge in hitting homers, these stadiums represent the best when considering a combination of ballpark dimensions and obstacles present. Which one will you conquer first?

Exclusive Deals Newsletter

Subscribe to our newsletter for all the latest gaming deals and exclusive offers.


Bruce L

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
Our privacy policy
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments