F1 2021: Austrian GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

Check out this guide for the best F1 2021 Red Bull Ring (Austria) dry and wet lap setup in Career Mode, My Team & Race.


The Red Bull Ring in Austria is quite possibly one of the most enjoyable tracks to drive on in F1 2021. What is, on paper, quite a simple circuit is actually quite a challenging affair.

The Austrian Grand Prix offers an interesting compromise between downforce and top speed, and is ideal for some close wheel-to-wheel racing.


Once you’ve mastered the track in F1 2021, you can engage in some amazing races. To help you achieve this, here’s our setup guide to getting the most out of the Austrian GP in F1 2021.

For more F1 2021 setup component information, refer to our Complete F1 2021 Setups Guide.

Best F1 2021 Austria Setup (Wet and Dry)

ComponentDry Lap SetupWet Lap Setup
Front Wing Aero44
Rear Wing Aero67
DT On Throttle0.700.70
DT Off Throttle0.600.55
Front Camber-2.80°-3.00°
Rear Camber-1.60°-1.50°
Front Toe0.08°0.08°
Rear Toe0.32°0.32°
Front Suspension33
Rear Suspension44
Front Anti-Roll Bar55
Rear Anti-Roll Bar56
Front Ride Height33
Rear Ride Height76
Brake Pressure100.0100.0
Front Brake Bias0.540.55
Front Right Tyre Pressure23.0 psi23.0 psi
Front Left Tyre Pressure23.0 psi23.0 psi
Rear Right Tyre Pressure22.3 psi21.9 psi
Rear Left Tyre Pressure22.3 psi21.9 psi

F1 2021 Austrian GP Setup Tips (Wet and Dry)

Aerodynamics

Dry Lap

  • Front Wing Aero: 4
  • Rear Wing Aero: 6

Wet Lap


  • Front Wing Aero: 4           
  • Rear Wing Aero: 7

As you can probably expect, you aren’t going to need a huge amount of aero for the Austrian Grand Prix circuit, but it’s more than you will want at Monza.

The twisty Sector 2 and the final couple of corners require a well-planted car, and that is where the most lap time can be gained or lost on what is a very, very short circuit for Formula One. If any aero levels do need increasing, it will be the front wing levels, perhaps a value or so higher for more turn-in.

Transmission

Dry Lap


  • Differential On Throttle: 70%
  • Differential Off Throttle: 60%

Wet Lap

  • Differential On Throttle: 70%
  • Differential Off Throttle: 55%

The Red Bull Ring is not a track that is particularly harsh on the tyres, and in most cases, if not all, usually only requires an easy one-stop strategy.

Our setup here has struck a strong balance between the on-throttle and off-throttle settings for the transmission, allowing you to have some great drive out of the corners – especially the hairpin at Turn 3, which requires good traction to stay close to your rival.

Suspension Geometry

Dry Lap

  • Front Camber: -2.80
  • Rear Camber: -1.60
  • Front Toe: 0.08
  • Rear Toe: 0.32

Wet Lap

  • Front Camber: -3.00
  • Rear Camber: -1.50
  • Front Toe: 0.08
  • Rear Toe: 0.32

You want a car in Austria that will get through the corners cleanly and not eat up the tyres. We could arguably go much more aggressive with some of the setup figures in this part of the car, but we are simply conscious of doing too much damage to the tyres or allowing the car to chew them up.

This applies to the front camber and front toe, and we found that the settings above allow for a nicely controlled car through the longer corners in Austria, and some of the slow-speed ones, too.

Suspension

Dry Lap

  • Front Suspension: 3
  • Rear Suspension: 4
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 5
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 5
  • Front Ride Height: 3
  • Rear Ride Height: 7

Wet Lap

  • Front Suspension: 3
  • Rear Suspension: 4
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 5
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 6
  • Front Ride Height: 3
  • Rear Ride Height: 6

The suspension, as ever, can be a bit more of a personal choice when it comes to your Austrian GP setup: it all depends on what you want the car to do. You want a nicely balanced car, though, that is predictable and doesn’t launch you one way or the other. We’ve gone for a fairly neutral anti-roll bar and suspension setup, which you can adjust to suit your driving style a bit better if required.  

The ride height is pretty standard for the Red Bull Ring. You have to take some of the kerbs quite aggressively to get the best lap time out of the car, and thus you are going to want to have a ride height that’s high enough to avoid your car bottoming out over them and spinning into the gravel. You can play with this part of the setup a bit more to your own preference.

Brakes

Dry Lap

  • Brake Pressure: 100%
  • Front Brake Bias: 54%

Wet Lap

  • Brake Pressure: 100%
  • Front Brake Bias: 55%

As with most brake setups in F1 2021, it’s best to go with high brake pressure and just over mid-line brake bias. Not only does this help to stave off lock-ups, but it also proves to be a particularly useful setup for the Austrian GP in F1 2021.

Tyres

Dry Lap

  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 23.0 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 23.0  psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 22.3 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 22.3 psi

Wet Lap

  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 23.0 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 23.0  psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 21.9 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 21.9 psi

As you might expect here, higher tyre pressures will be key. Don’t worry too much about the tyre wear, as any increase in tyre pressures will certainly aid you when it comes to top-speed and help you to make overtaking moves.

The best places to overtake at the Austrian GP are into Turn 3 and into Turn 4, at the end of the two main DRS zones at the Red Bull Ring. Keep an eye on tyre temperatures and wear during practice, but you should be okay with the higher tyre pressures. We’ve lowered the tyre pressures at the rear for the wet running to preserve the intermediate tyres.

It might seem like a simple circuit, but the Red Bull Ring has its complexities and is an absolute blast to drive around. Plus, if you are relatively new to the F1 game series, you will find Austria to be the ideal venue for learning the basics of driving the car, cornering, and how the cars behave.

Got an Austrian Grand Prix setup of your own? Share it with us in the comments section below!

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Henry K

Keen player of both simulation and racing games. Can mostly be found playing the F1 series, Train Simulator, Assetto Corsa, with a bit of Battlefield thrown in between.
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