F1 2021: Italian GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

Check out this guide for the best F1 2021 Autodromo Nazionale di Monza (Italy) dry and wet lap setup in Career Mode, My Team & Race.


Monza is often called the ‘Temple Of Speed’ due to its incredible high-speed nature and the history that the circuit holds. It has been almost a constant fixture on the Formula One calendar since the World Championship was created in 1950, and has produced many a stunning race.

We only have to look at last year’s absolute epic that saw Pierre Gasly hold off Carlos Sainz for an inspired victory in the AlphaTauri.


In F1 2021, the Italian GP is, once again, a thrill ride. To help you navigate the legendary venue, here is our setup guide for the Monza circuit in F1 2021.

The F1 2021 setup component can be tricky to understand, but if you’d like to learn more about each, refer to our Complete F1 2021 Setups Guide.

Best F1 2021 Italy Setup (Wet and Dry)

ComponentDry Lap SetupWet Lap Setup
Front Wing Aero44
Rear Wing Aero55
DT On Throttle0.700.70
DT Off Throttle0.600.60
Front Camber-2.50°-2.50°
Rear Camber-1.50°-1.50°
Front Toe0.10°0.10°
Rear Toe0.35°0.35°
Front Suspension33
Rear Suspension55
Front Anti-Roll Bar44
Rear Anti-Roll Bar77
Front Ride Height33
Rear Ride Height78
Brake Pressure100.0100.0
Front Brake Bias0.540.55
Front Right Tyre Pressure23.0 psi23.0 psi
Front Left Tyre Pressure23.0 psi23.0 psi
Rear Right Tyre Pressure21.9 psi21.9 psi
Rear Left Tyre Pressure21.9 psi21.9 psi

F1 2021 Italian GP Setup Tips (Wet and Dry)

Aerodynamics

Dry Lap

  • Front Wing Aero: 4
  • Rear Wing Aero: 5

Wet Lap


  • Front Wing Aero: 4
  • Rear Wing Aero: 5

Perhaps unsurprisingly, you aren’t going to need a huge amount of aero for the Monza circuit. It is high-speed in nature, and in real life, you often see the teams run the skinniest rear wings that they can possibly get away with. This remains true when it comes to wet running because those straights are so crucial to lap times.

You need some downforce for the chicanes and the Lesmo corners, but those are the only parts of the track where downforce really matters.

Transmission

Dry Lap


  • Differential On Throttle: 70%
  • Differential Off Throttle:60%

Wet Lap

  • Differential On Throttle: 70%
  • Differential Off Throttle: 60%

Unsurprisingly, you are probably going to feel that a more locked differential setup is the best way to go around the Monza circuit. It’s simply a case that there is a multitude of traction zones at the Italian venue: out of the first two chicanes, through the Lesmos, and Variante Ascari as well.

Whilst there are a couple of fast corners, such as the Parabolica at the end of the lap, the traction that you need in the chicanes outweighs the sustained grip for the final corner, which starts to become flat-out halfway through.

Suspension Geometry

Dry Lap

  • Front Camber: 2.50
  • Rear Camber: 1.50
  • Front Toe: 0.10
  • Rear Toe: 0.35

Wet Lap

  • Front Camber: 2.50
  • Rear Camber: 1.50
  • Front Toe: 0.10  
  • Rear Toe: 0.35

The only real extreme that we are dealing with here, when it comes to camber and toe, is the front camber. Given that you need plenty of grip out the corners, you can go all the way along for the front camber to get as much rear grip down as possible in some of the track’s corners.

Compared to a lot of the other setup adjustments that you need to make for Monza, you have some pretty neutral front and rear toe setups, which should help to keep the car nicely balanced. Other factors, such as the ride height and aerodynamics, are more vital at Monza.

Suspension

Dry Lap

  • Front Suspension: 3
  • Rear Suspension: 5
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 4
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 7
  • Front Ride Height: 3
  • Rear Ride Height: 7

Wet Lap

  • Front Suspension: 3
  • Rear Suspension: 5
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 4
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 7
  • Front Ride Height: 3
  • Rear Ride Height: 8

Ride height is crucial in F1 2021, perhaps more so now than in any other F1 game. While you need plenty of straight-line speed at Monza, what you also want is a stable car that won’t get unsettled through the bumps.

Plus, a few of Monza’s kerbs can be pretty brutal, so be careful when going over those – particularly when it comes to the exit of Variante Ascari. Get that wrong, and you will almost certainly end up in the wall, through the gravel, or spinning around.

You can play with the suspension and anti-roll bar settings a bit as well, perhaps bringing the suspension more to the softer side to avoid some of the bumps around the track. You won’t find yourself accelerating particularly harshly, and be mindful of not going too soft, otherwise, the car will bounce over the kerbs.

Brakes

Dry Lap

  • Brake Pressure: 100%
  • Front Brake Bias: 54%

Wet Lap

  • Brake Pressure: 100%
  • Front Brake Bias: 55%

For the Italian GP on F1 2021, you really need a lot of stopping power. This applies in both the wet and the dry, as even when it is pouring with rain, you are still going to reach some pretty high speeds down the straights. You’ll certainly be hitting those top speeds across the chequered line, down to the first Variante chicane.

Front locking will be more of a problem than rear locking at Monza, so that is something that you should adjust accordingly.

Tyres

Dry Lap

  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 23.0 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 23.0  psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 21.9 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 21.9 psi

Wet Lap

  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 23.0 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 23.0  psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 21.9 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 21.9 psi

Tyre life isn’t really something that you should worry about too much at Monza. It is going to be a bit of a challenge on the soft tyres after qualifying and in the first stint of the race, but both the medium and hard tyres should get you to the end easily after your pit stops.

So, you can afford to crank those tyre pressures up in the dry and the wet to eke out as much straight-line speed as possible. Any speed that you can get will certainly aid in both defending and overtaking.

The Italian Grand Prix is always a spectacle, and it is fantastic that this year, it is set to welcome the famous Tifosi once again in support of Ferrari. In F1 2021, you can experience the thrills of the Temple of Speed with the greatest shot at success by using the Italian GP setups detailed above.

Do you have an Italian Grand Prix setup for F1 2021? Let us know in the comments below!

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Henry K

Keen player of both simulation and racing games. Can mostly be found playing the F1 series, Train Simulator, Assetto Corsa, with a bit of Battlefield thrown in between.
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