F1 22 Australia Setup: Melbourne Wet and Dry Guide

We've got the best F1 22 Australia (Melbourne) dry and wet setup in Career Mode, My Team & Online.


The Australian Grand Prix debuted at Albert Park, Melbourne in 1996 and is the traditional season opener for the Formula One World Championship. Melbourne is one of the quirkiest tracks of the year, being quite a fast and flowing street circuit, and unlike other street tracks on the calendar, such as Monaco and Singapore. The circuit is 5.278km in track length with 14 turns and is always previewed as one of the most enjoyable tracks to drive both for the professionals and gamers in F1 22.

This guide gives you the best setup possible for the Australian GP, wet and dry, to allow you to be the fastest that you can be around the incredible Albert Park Circuit in Melbourne.


If you want to learn more about each F1 22 setup option, consult our complete F1 22 setups guide.

These are the recommended settings for the best F1 22 Australia setup for dry and wet laps on the Albert Park Circuit.

Best F1 22 Australia (Melbourne) dry setup

Use these car settings for the best setup in Australia:

  • Front Wing Aero: 14
  • Rear Wing Aero: 25
  • DT On Throttle: 90%
  • DT Off Throttle: 53%
  • Front Camber: -2.50
  • Rear Camber: -2.00
  • Front Toe: 0.05
  • Rear Toe: 0.20
  • Front Suspension: 2
  • Rear Suspension: 5
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 3
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 6
  • Front Ride Height: 3
  • Rear Ride Height: 6
  • Brake Pressure: 95%
  • Front Brake Bias: 56%
  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 22.2 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 22.2 psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 22.7 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 22.7 psi
  • Tyre Strategy (25% race): Soft-Medium
  • Pit Window (25% race): 5-7 Lap
  • Fuel (25% race): +1.5 Laps

Best F1 22 Australia (Melbourne) wet setup

  • Front Wing Aero: 24
  • Rear Wing Aero: 37
  • DT On Throttle: 50%
  • DT Off Throttle: 54%
  • Front Camber: -2.50
  • Rear Camber: -2.00
  • Front Toe: 0.05
  • Rear Toe: 0.20
  • Front Suspension: 2
  • Rear Suspension: 5
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 3
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 6
  • Front Ride Height: 3
  • Rear Ride Height: 6
  • Brake Pressure: 100%
  • Front Brake Bias: 53%
  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 25 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 25 psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 23 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 23 psi
  • Tyre Strategy (25% race): Soft-Medium
  • Pit Window (25% race): 5-7 Lap
  • Fuel (25% race): +1.5 Laps


Aerodynamics

A good balance of front and rear downforce is essential to having a hooked front end but not to produce too much drag down the long straights in Sector 1 and Sector 2.

Sector 2 consists of medium to high-speed corners and there are some slow-to-medium corners in the tail end of Sector 3, which require increased downforce.

Keeping front aero at 14 and rear aero at 25 is low enough to have an advantage in straights and provides downforce for high-speed turns. The rear aero is higher to ensure stability in the high-speed corners in Sector 2 and the start of Sector 3. Turn 1 (Brabham) and Turn 2 (Jones), and the high-speed turns of 11 and 12 lead up to a DRS zone and it’s important to have confidence in the cars grip to maximise lap time.


For the wet, the aero values increase to 24 and 37 on the front and rear as more downforce is needed for the high-to-medium speed corners in Sectors 2 and 3. To maximise lap times, you will need more grip at Ascari, Stewart, and Prost, which will quickly lead you into the Start-Finish straight. You are more likely to spin out in the wet, and straight-line speed is not so much of a problem as it is in the dry.

Transmission

The Australian Grand Prix doesn’t have many slow-speed corners, with most being medium-to-high speed. The penultimate corner before the pit lane entry is a slow speed corner, so a good level of traction will be needed here to avoid spinning up the rear tyres.

Set the on-throttle differential to 90% to aid in the traction zones of Sectors 2 and 3. In these sectors, there are traction zones to tackle out of Turns 3 and 4, following the Whiteford turn, and the long left and right handers. Off-throttle differential is at 53% to aid in corner turn in. 

For wet conditions, however, it would be wise to lock the differential a little bit more. Traction outright out of a corner will be more vital in the wet due to the slower cornering speed. Set the on-throttle differential to 50% and maintain off-throttle at 53%. This change is made so that you don’t have an increased amount of wheel spin as it’s better to feed the power gently for greater traction. Try to keep your differential settings somewhere in the middle when it’s wet.

Suspension Geometry

When it comes to camber, the more negative it is, the more grip you have in sustained cornering situations; given that most of Melbourne’s corners are swooping and flowing, you’ll need that sustained camber level. Equally, though, bear in mind that the penultimate corner and Turn 3 are slower, so you’ll have to balance it out.

Tyre wear isn’t a major concern here as the track has been revamped, which gives you room to be a bit more aggressive with the setup. Setting the camber values at -2.50 and -2.00 in the front and rear in dry conditions will help save your tyres for the long run and also provide maximum grip at Turn 3, 6, 9, and 11. You’ll feel a difference even in the Ascari, Stewart, and Prost corners of Turns 13, 14, and 15.

Set the front and rear toe to 0.05 and 0.20, as you’ll want a sharp responding yet stable car for this circuit. Responsiveness on turn in will improve without sacrificing stability.

Keep these values the same for wet conditions.

Suspension

Melbourne is a street track, which means that it’s going to be quite bumpy and relatively punishing on the car, although it is less bumpy than other street tracks.

A softer suspension setup is key to this circuit in F1 22, which can then be balanced out with a fairly neutral anti-roll bar setting. Set the front and rear suspension to 2 and 5. For anti-roll bars, it’s suggested 3 for the front and 5 for the rear. The lower front will not be compromised on the bumps and braking on corners, and the stiffer rear ARB will help with stability. You may get some oversteer if the rear ARB is too stiff. Decrease the rear ARB a bit if it doesn’t suit your driving style.

Given the long straights at this track, you don’t want to go too low with the ride heights. A setting of 3 and 6 for the front and rear ride height will ensure you don’t get thrown off into the barriers, especially at Turns 11 and 12.

As the bumps will still be there in the wet, keep that suspension and anti-roll bar setting as it was in the dry. However, you can bring the ride height down a tad if you want. Drag isn’t so much of a big deal in the wet, and you can afford to lose some straight-line speed to keep that car stuck firmer to the ground.

Brakes

Braking is absolutely essential at any track. The stopping distance is always a balancing act: you don’t want to be locking up those tyres, but you do want to stop as quickly as possible. A 95% break pressure is great for the dry at the Australian GP, as it’ll give you a little bit of leeway into the corners. Set front brake bias at 56% to prevent front lock-up at Turns 1 and 3.

For the wet, as your braking distance will be longer due to braking earlier, you can increase the brake pressure towards 100% to avoid lockups, which will be more likely in the wet – you can potentially carry more speed into the corners, too. Bring brake bias to 53% to ensure that neither the fronts nor the rears lock up.

Tyres

Giving an increase in tyre pressure can deliver more straight-line speed, but don’t be afraid to crank up the rear tyre pressures a bit to get more out of your car down those long straights. Set the front to 22.2 psi and the rear to 22.7 psi.

In the wet, it’s best to increase these slightly to 25 psi for the front and 23 psi for the rear. Remember, increased tyre pressures can increase tyre temperatures, and straight-line speed is not so much of a big deal in the wet.

Pit window (25% race)

Starting on the softs will give you an edge in the opening laps to make moves early. Capitalising on the first few laps is crucial and can set the tone for the rest of your race. Pitting at about laps 5-7 is optimum as the softs start to fall off at about this point in the race. Change to the mediums for the final stint.

Fuel strategy (25% race)

+1.5 on the fuel is good enough to finish the race without worrying about conserving. It can be especially difficult for new players to save fuel as they get accustomed to the mechanics of the game. 

There you have it: those are the best car settings that you can apply in F1 22 for the Australian Grand Prix on wet laps and dry laps.  

Have you got your own Australian Grand Prix setup? Share it with us in the comments below!

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Henry K

Keen player of both simulation and racing games. Can mostly be found playing the F1 series, Train Simulator, Assetto Corsa, with a bit of Battlefield thrown in between.
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