F1 2021: French Grand Prix Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

Check out this guide for the best F1 2021 Circuit Paul Ricard (France) dry and wet lap setup in Career Mode, My Team & Race.


France is steeped in motorsport history, so its absence from the Formula One calendar from 2008 to 2018 was one that that felt very weird to all involved. So, when World Championships returned to France at Paul Ricard in 2018, there was a great deal of anticipation.

Returning again after a pandemic-induced hiatus, the track served up one of the races of the season, which saw Max Verstappen take an incredible victory.


In F1 2021, the track is a tricky but flowing little number. Here, we’re going through how to setup your car to get the best out of the French Grand Prix circuit.

To learn the ins and outs of every F1 2021 setup component, go to our Complete F1 2021 Setups Guide.

Best F1 2021 France Setup (Wet and Dry)

ComponentDry Lap SetupWet Lap Setup
Front Wing Aero67
Rear Wing Aero55
DT On Throttle0.800.80
DT Off Throttle0.800.80
Front Camber-3.00°-2.90°
Rear Camber-1.40°-1.40°
Front Toe0.11°0.09°
Rear Toe0.35°0.41°
Front Suspension64
Rear Suspension64
Front Anti-Roll Bar55
Rear Anti-Roll Bar55
Front Ride Height34
Rear Ride Height34
Brake Pressure100.00.98
Front Brake Bias0.570.55
Front Right Tyre Pressure23.0 psi22.6 psi
Front Left Tyre Pressure23.0 psi22.6 psi
Rear Right Tyre Pressure21.5 psi21.5 psi
Rear Left Tyre Pressure21.5 psi21.5 psi

F1 2021 French GP Setup Tips (Wet and Dry)

Aerodynamics

Dry Lap

  • Front Wing Aero: 6
  • Rear Wing Aero: 5

Wet Lap


  • Front Wing Aero: 7
  • Rear Wing Aero: 5

The fact that Mercedes made this track their own in the first couple of races should show you all that you need to know regarding its layout. It is a power-sensitive beast, but one that also requires a well-rounded chassis, and Red Bull showed that with a good chassis and lower wings in 2021, you can extract great lap times.

Hooking up the front is the most important part due to the tight and twisty nature of Sector 1, with Sectors 2 and 3 being almost flat out all the way, and certainly a lot quicker than Sector 1. Crank the front wing levels up a little bit in the wet, just to be safe.

Transmission

Dry Lap


  • Differential On Throttle: 80%
  • Differential Off Throttle: 80%

Wet Lap

  • Differential On Throttle: 80%
  • Differential Off Throttle: 80%

Circuit Paul Ricard usually isn’t much of a tyre killer. However, it’s easy to overcook things in F1 2021. The real life French Grand Prix showed that it was very much touch-and-go if a two-stop strategy would work, but Verstappen and Red Bull showed that it was the way to go.

Anywhere between 75 and 80 per cent for on and off throttle differential settings would work in the wet and dry. Just remember that Sector 1 will need good outright traction, but Sector 2 and 3 will be more biased towards constant traction in longer corners.

Suspension Geometry

Dry Lap

  • Front Camber: 3.00
  • Rear Camber: 1.40
  • Front Toe: 0.11          
  • Rear Toe: 0.35

Wet Lap

  • Front Camber: 2.90
  • Rear Camber: 1.40
  • Front Toe: 0.09          
  • Rear Toe: 0.41

Whilst we have mentioned that it is easy to overdo it on tyre wear at the French GP, it isn’t anywhere near as much of a tyre killer as the likes of Silverstone or Spain.

Thus, you can have a bit more negative camber to get the car to turn in for those twisty corners before the Mistral Straight and for the Chicane Nord halfway through. Plus, you should easily be able to control tyre temperatures on this circuit.

Front stability is also essential at this track, particularly for the aforementioned Sector 1 and Chicane Nord: the final corner is a pretty slow-speed and tricky one, too.

You can certainly get away with a bit more rear and front toe, and the stability of the car should still be pretty good and strong enough that you won’t have to worry. In the wet, it should be fine in that regard too, but knocking it back might not be a bad idea given how much more difficult it can be to control a car in the wet.

Suspension

Dry Lap

  • Front Suspension: 6  
  • Rear Suspension: 6
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 5
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 5
  • Front Ride Height: 3
  • Rear Ride Height: 3

Wet Lap

  • Front Suspension: 4  
  • Rear Suspension: 4
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 5
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 5
  • Front Ride Height: 4
  • Rear Ride Height: 4

Circuit Paul Ricard is a much smoother track than most on the calendar. In real life, it is predominantly a testing track, thus ensuring that it is smooth is a priority. You can certainly get away with a slightly stiffer suspension setup as a result, and pairing that with a fairly neutral anti-roll bar setup is also a good idea both in the wet and dry.

Lowering the ride height as much as possible will give you an edge down the Mistral Straight – the key overtaking zone – as you head into the Chicane Nord. For wet running, up it slightly, just to give your car a bit more ground clearance and ensure that it is more aerodynamically stable in the tricky conditions.

Brakes

Dry Lap

  • Brake Pressure: 100%
  • Front Brake Bias: 57%

Wet Lap

  • Brake Pressure: 98%
  • Front Brake Bias: 55%

Given the high speeds and the smooth track surface that you can find yourself doing at the French GP, we say to keep that brake pressure up to 100 per cent in the dry.

Balance out any locking up with your brake bias and try to find the perfect combination that works for you. Hopefully, you can go deep on the brakes into the Chicane Nord on the Mistral Straight.

Tyres

Dry Lap

  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 23.0 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 23.0 psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 21.5 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 21.5 psi

Wet Lap

  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 22.6 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 22.6 psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 21.5 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 21.5 psi

Given that you can probably get away with putting more strain on the tyres in France, you can afford to crank up those pressures slightly to get a bit more straight-line speed out of the car. Even Turn 1 can be an overtaking opportunity thanks to the DRS zone, and with it being a shorter straight, you will want as much straight-line speed as is humanly possible.

If it’s a rainy day in Le Castellet, and given that you will probably need to make the intermediates or wets last a bit longer, there isn’t any harm in bringing those tyre pressures down a touch.

Those are the F1 2021 setups that you need to get the best lap times possible from the Circuit Paul Ricard. It’s fast, it’s flowing, and quite a pretty track too, so when you nail the setup and race plan, it certainly won’t serve up a borefest!

Have you got your own French Grand Prix setup for F1 2021? Share it with us in the comments below!

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Henry K

Keen player of both simulation and racing games. Can mostly be found playing the F1 series, Train Simulator, Assetto Corsa, with a bit of Battlefield thrown in between.
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