F1 2021: Monaco GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

Check out this guide for the best F1 2021 Circuit de Monaco dry and wet lap setup in Career Mode, My Team & Race.


Monaco is the crown jewel in the Formula One calendar. After a rare absence in 2020, the Monaco Grand Prix returned this year, and fans all over the world were so happy to see it back.

You can experience this sublime track in F1 2021, and to ensure that you make the most of it, we have the best Monaco GP setup for you right here.


To find out more about each F1 2021 setup component, check out the Complete F1 2021 Setups Guide.

Best F1 2021 Monaco Setup (Wet and Dry)

ComponentDry Lap SetupWet Lap Setup
Front Wing Aero1111
Rear Wing Aero910
DT On Throttle0.800.80
DT Off Throttle0.800.80
Front Camber-2.90°-2.90°
Rear Camber-1.40°-1.40°
Front Toe0.11°0.10°
Rear Toe0.35°0.32°
Front Suspension44
Rear Suspension44
Front Anti-Roll Bar66
Rear Anti-Roll Bar66
Front Ride Height54
Rear Ride Height54
Brake Pressure0.980.95
Front Brake Bias0.550.55
Front Right Tyre Pressure23.0 psi22.6 psi
Front Left Tyre Pressure23.0 psi22.6 psi
Rear Right Tyre Pressure21.9 psi21.5 psi
Rear Left Tyre Pressure21.9 psi21.5 psi

F1 2021 Monaco GP Setup Tips (Wet and Dry)

Aerodynamics

Dry Lap

  • Front Wing Aero: 11
  • Rear Wing Aero: 9

Wet Lap

  • Front Wing Aero: 11
  • Rear Wing Aero: 10

Monaco is a track that is all about downforce, and lots of it. The only two main straights on the track, across the chequered line and through the tunnel, are too short for you to worry about any straight-line speed; although, trimming back the rear wing a touch will certainly help.


Pile on the downforce at Monaco as all that you need is that car to stick to the ground. In fact, it is certainly worth adding a bit more downforce to the rear wing in the wet, too, given how easy it will be to spin the rear tyres and lose grip on what isn’t a high grip track surface.

Transmission

Dry Lap

  • Differential On Throttle: 80%
  • Differential Off Throttle: 80%

Wet Lap


  • Differential On Throttle: 80%
  • Differential Off Throttle: 80%

For the Monaco GP in F1 2021, you aren’t going to have to worry about long corners at high speeds. Pretty much every corner of the Circuit de Monaco is slow-to-medium speed at best, with the swimming pool complex being an obvious exception.

If you can get the best drive out of the corners that you possibly can, you’ll be in a good place for qualifying and the race – so lock that differential a bit more. You can usually get away with similar settings in the wet as outright traction will be even more important when there isn’t as much grip on the low-grip street track.

Suspension Geometry

Dry Lap

  • Front Camber: 2.90
  • Rear Camber: 1.40
  • Front Toe: 0.11  
  • Rear Toe: 0.35

Wet Lap

  • Front Camber: 2.90
  • Rear Camber: 1.40
  • Front Toe: 0.10
  • Rear Toe: 0.32

Given how there aren’t really any sustained corners at the Monaco GP, having a lot of negative camber isn’t the way to go. Sure, the swimming pool complex is fast and flowing, but it’s not a long, sustained sweeping corner like Pouhon at Spa.

You can afford to lose some negative camber for this F1 2021 setup to ensure that there is as much grip as possible in those slow corners. Regarding toe in and out, you want the car to turn quite responsively into the corners, so adjust the toe angles as required: a lazy car will not do you any good around Monaco.

Suspension

Dry Lap

  • Front Suspension: 4         
  • Rear Suspension: 4
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 6
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 6
  • Front Ride Height: 5
  • Rear Ride Height: 5

Wet Lap

  • Front Suspension: 4         
  • Rear Suspension: 4
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 6
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 6
  • Front Ride Height: 4
  • Rear Ride Height: 4

Monaco is a street track, the toughest of the bunch, which means that it’s going to be quite bumpy and relatively punishing on the car, more so than circuits like Melbourne.

A softer suspension setup is key to the Monaco GP in F1 2021, which can then be balanced out by a fairly neutral anti-roll bar setting that’s still higher than five as tyre wear isn’t a significant factor on this track. A five at the front and back is pretty good for the ride height as it’ll help a little bit with straight-line speed through the tunnel and along the pit straight.

Given that the bumps will still be there in the wet, keep that suspension and anti-roll bar setting as it is in the dry. However, definitely bring that ride height down. You want the car to be absolutely planted in the wet, but with just enough clearance to not unsettle the car.

Brakes

Dry Lap

  • Brake Pressure: 98%
  • Front Brake Bias: 55%

Wet Lap

  • Brake Pressure: 95%
  • Front Brake Bias: 55%

Monaco has quite short braking zones, so you are going to want to maximize your car’s braking power. As such, it’s a good idea to bring the brake pressure down slightly from 100 per cent and around the 98-mark. For front brake bias, bring it in to around 55 per cent to counter any front locking.

For the wet, as your braking distance will be longer due to you braking earlier, you should bring the brake pressure down a bit, closer to 95 per cent. A subtle adjustment will make all of the difference on this track. Beyond that, keep the brake pressure the same.

Tyres

Dry Lap

  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 23.0 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 23.0 psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 21.9 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 21.9 psi

Wet Lap

  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 22.6 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 22.6 psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 21.5 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 21.5 psi

Given that an increase in tyre pressure can give more straight-line speed, it’s not a bad idea to bump it up slightly as the Monaco track’s straights are some of the best overtaking zones. The 23.0 and 21.9 range for the fronts and rears, respectively, will work great. Also, you don’t need to worry too much about tyre wear as Monaco is not a tyre-killer at all.

You are more than likely going to go a long way on wet or intermediate tyres in Monaco. So, bring those tyre pressures down a good chunk. This will help you massively to keep the tyre temperatures down and to avoid another pit stop.

The Monaco GP is undoubtedly one of the most challenging tracks to master in F1 2021. Still, if you use the best setup detailed above, you’ll be one step closer to dominating the showpiece circuit of the Formula One calendar.

Have you got your own Monaco Grand Prix setup? Share it with us in the comments below!

Looking for more setup guides?

F1 2021: Mexican GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Austrian GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Brazilian GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: United States Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Abu Dhabi GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Russian GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Japanese GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Hungarian GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Singapore GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Italian GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: British GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Belgian GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Chinese GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Azerbaijan (Baku) GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Australian GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Bahrain GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Spanish GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: French GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021 Setups and Settings Explained: Everything You Need Know about Differentials, Downforce, Brakes, and More


Exclusive Deals Newsletter

Subscribe to our newsletter for all the latest gaming deals and exclusive offers.


Henry K

Keen player of both simulation and racing games. Can mostly be found playing the F1 series, Train Simulator, Assetto Corsa, with a bit of Battlefield thrown in between.
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
Our privacy policy
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments