F1 22: Monaco Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

Check out our guide for the best F1 22 Monaco dry and wet setup in Career Mode, My Team & Online.


Monaco is the crown jewel in the Formula One calendar. After a rare absence in 2020, the Monaco Grand Prix is back again this year, and fans all over the world were so happy to see it back.

Monaco is the most prestigious race on the Formula One calendar, and with a total length of 3.337km, it is also the shortest track. The track has 19 corners and a single DRS zone on the start-finish straight. Top speeds at Circuit de Monaco can reach 295km/h.


The Monaco street circuit has been on the motorsport calendar since 1929. Monaco, the Indy 500, and the 24 hours of Le Mans form the Triple Crown and the only driver to have won all three races is Graham Hill.

The streets of Monaco pose a tremendous challenge for the best drivers in the world and is considered the most demanding race on the F1 calendar. The unforgiving walls and tight corners are a match for even the best of drivers.

Daniel Ricciardo (2018), Lewis Hamilton (2019), Nico Rosberg (2015), and Sebastien Vettel (2017) have cemented their name in history by winning at the principality.

Take your place on the podium by following the best F1 22 Monaco setup.


To find out more about each F1 22 setup component, check out the complete F1 22 setups guide.

These are the best wet and dry lap setups for the Monaco circuit.

The best F1 22 Monaco setup

  • Front Wing Aero: 50
  • Rear Wing Aero: 50
  • DT On Throttle: 85%
  • DT Off Throttle: 54%
  • Front Camber: -2.50
  • Rear Camber: -2.00
  • Front Toe: 0.05
  • Rear Toe: 0.20
  • Front Suspension: 1
  • Rear Suspension: 3
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 1
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 3
  • Front Ride Height: 3
  • Rear Ride Height: 4
  • Brake Pressure: 100%
  • Front Brake Bias: 50%
  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 25 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 25 psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 23 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 23 psi
  • Tyre Strategy (25% race): Soft-Medium
  • Pit Window (25% race): 5-7 Lap
  • Fuel (25% race): +1.5 Laps

The best F1 22 Monaco setup (wet)

  • Front Wing Aero: 50
  • Rear Wing Aero: 50
  • DT On Throttle: 85%
  • DT Off Throttle: 50%
  • Front Camber: -2.50
  • Rear Camber: -2.00
  • Front Toe: 0.05
  • Rear Toe: 0.20
  • Front Suspension: 1
  • Rear Suspension: 5
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 1
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 5
  • Front Ride Height: 1
  • Rear Ride Height: 7
  • Brake Pressure: 100%
  • Front Brake Bias: 50%
  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 25 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 25 psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 23 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 23 psi
  • Tyre Strategy (25% race): Soft-Medium
  • Pit Window (25% race): 5-7 Lap
  • Fuel (25% race): +1.5 Laps

Aerodynamics setup

Monaco is a track that is all about downforce, and lots of it. Teams make custom wings for the race known as Monaco spec wings. The only two main straights on the track, across the chequered line and through the tunnel, are too short for you to worry about any straight-line speed and reducing drag; although, trimming back the rear wing a touch can help.


The front and rear wings in the dry are at 50 and 50. You’ll see time improvements in all three sectors from having wings at maximum. At Monaco, you need the car to stick to the ground so pile on the downforce.

In the wet, the downforce remains at maximum (50 and 50) as it is easy to spin the rear tyres and lose grip on a track that isn’t a high grip surface.

Transmission setup

For the Monaco GP in F1 22, you aren’t going to have to worry about long corners at high speeds. Pretty much every corner of the Circuit de Monaco is slow-to-medium speed at best, with the only exceptions being Tabac, Louis Chiron chicane, and the Swimming Pool complex

If you can get the best drive out of the corners, you’ll be in a good place for qualifying and the race – so lock on-throttle differential to 85% to benefit from better traction out of corners. Set the off-throttle to 54% to make it easier to get the car rotated.

You can usually get away with similar settings in the wet as outright traction will be even more important when there isn’t as much grip on the low-grip street track. In the wet, the on-throttle remains the same (85%) to maximise traction on this street track. Differential off-throttle is reduced to 50%; this will reduce difficulty on turn-in even further.

Suspension geometry setup

Given how there aren’t really any sustained corners at the Monaco GP. Sure, the Swimming Pool complex is fast and flowing, but it’s not a long, sustained sweeping corner like Pouhon at Spa. Instead, there are medium to slow corners like Mirabeau, Massenet, and Casino, so excessive negative camber won’t benefit much. It will only increase tyre wear and reduce grip in the slower-speed corners.

Set the front camber to -2.50 and rear camber to -2.00 in this F1 22 Monaco setup. As a result, you ensure as much grip as possible in the slow corners.

Camber values remain the same for wet conditions.

For the toe angles, you will benefit from having a responsive car going into turns like the Swimming Pool section, Massenet, and Casino. A lazy car won’t inspire driver confidence in the car, leading to a loss in lap time. Set the toe values to 0.05 in the front and 0.20 in the rear for both dry and wet conditions.

Suspension setup

Monaco is a street track, the toughest of the bunch, which means that it’s going to be quite bumpy and relatively punishing on the car, more so than circuits like Melbourne.

A softer suspension setup is key to the Monaco GP in F1 22, allowing you to attack the kerbs wherever possible without being unsettled by any bumps throughout the lap.

In the dry, the front and rear suspension are set to 1 and 3. The front is much softer than the rear so you go over kerbs quickly without disturbing high-speed aerodynamic stability for sections like Louis Chiron.

The anti-roll bar is at 1 and 3 to keep things balanced

Ride height is set to 3 and 4 to ensure you don’t bottom out on the bumpy sections on the run down to the Casino, improve car stability and help with straight-line speed through the tunnel and along the pit straight.

Given that the bumps will still be there in the wet, keep front suspension at 1 but increase rear suspension to 5. Increase the rear ARB to 5 and lower the front ride height to 1 raise the rear to 7. You want the car to be absolutely planted in the wet, but with just enough clearance to not unsettle the car.

Brakes setup

Monaco has quite short braking zones, so you are going to want to maximise your car’s braking power. As such, it’s a good idea to have the brake pressure 100% and brake bias is at 50% to help counteract front locking into corners like Sainte Devote, Nouvelle and Mirabeau Haute.

For the wet lap, we have left both the same as your braking distance will be longer due to you braking earlier. However, you can bring brake pressure down a bit, closer to 95 per cent. A subtle adjustment will make all of the difference on this track. Beyond that, keep the brake bias the same.

Tyres setup

Monaco is not a tyre-killer, however, given that an increase in tyre pressure can give more straight-line speed, it’s not a bad idea to bump it up slightly as the Monaco track’s straights are some of the best overtaking zones. Increase tyre pressures at the front to 25 psi and the rear to 23 psi to increase the straight-line speed and aid in overtaking. You want to use the only DRS zone as best as possible on this track. Rears are lower than the fronts for better traction.

Tyre pressures remain the same in the wet. You are more than likely going to go a long way on wet or intermediate tyres in Monaco. So, bring those tyre pressures down, if needed. This will help keep tyre temperatures down and avoid another pit stop.

Pit window (25% race)

Starting from the softs and gaining early positions is crucial, as overtaking is notoriously difficult at this track. Stopping around lap 5-7 would be ideal as grip levels begin to wear off.  You could stop undercut chances by stopping on lap 5 and carry the mediums to the end of the race.

Fuel strategy (25% race)

Fuel at +1.5 would ensure you have plenty of the race duration. Running a bit lower wouldn’t be a bad idea, either, as it’s easy to save fuel by lifting and coasting here due to the increased difficulty in overtaking.

The Monaco GP is undoubtedly the most iconic and one of the most challenging tracks to master in F1 22. If you use the Monaco setup detailed above, you’ll be one step closer to dominating the showpiece circuit of the Formula One calendar.

Have you got your own Monaco Grand Prix setup? Share it with us in the comments below!

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Henry K

Keen player of both simulation and racing games. Can mostly be found playing the F1 series, Train Simulator, Assetto Corsa, with a bit of Battlefield thrown in between.
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