F1 2021: Belgian GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

Check out this guide for the best F1 2021 Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps (Belgium) dry and wet lap setup in Career Mode, My Team & Race.


The Spa circuit is one of the most fearsome on the Formula One calendar. It provides a very unique challenge, with Sector 1 and Sector 3 being all about high-speed, but Sector 2 being a tight and twisty affair, requiring plenty of downforce.

As you would imagine, it’s not the easiest track to setup for in the game. So, this is our setup guide for the tough but very entertaining Belgian GP in F1 2021.


If you’d like to learn more about the setup components in this game, check out the Complete F1 2021 Setups Guide.

Best F1 2021 Belgium Setup (Wet and Dry)

ComponentDry Lap SetupWet Lap Setup
Front Wing Aero44
Rear Wing Aero55
DT On Throttle0.700.70
DT Off Throttle0.650.65
Front Camber-3.00°-3.00°
Rear Camber-1.40°-1.40°
Front Toe0.11°0.10°
Rear Toe0.32°0.35°
Front Suspension66
Rear Suspension66
Front Anti-Roll Bar55
Rear Anti-Roll Bar55
Front Ride Height34
Rear Ride Height77
Brake Pressure100.0100.0
Front Brake Bias0.540.57
Front Right Tyre Pressure23.4 psi23.0 psi
Front Left Tyre Pressure23.4 psi23.0 psi
Rear Right Tyre Pressure21.9 psi21.5 psi
Rear Left Tyre Pressure21.9 psi21.5 psi

F1 2021 Belgian GP Setup Tips (Wet and Dry)

Aerodynamics

Dry Lap

  • Front Wing Aero: 4
  • Rear Wing Aero: 5

Wet Lap

  • Front Wing Aero: 4
  • Rear Wing Aero: 5

Spa is mostly about power and straight-line speed, but then Sector 2 requires quite a bit of downforce. In the real Formula One, you will regularly see relatively skinny rear wings to deal with the higher speed demands.


In F1 2021, you can bring the rear wing to below the default six-rating, as well as the front wing, to create a balanced setup for the circuit. Doing this allows you to push hard in the middle sector and not lose out in Sectors 1 and 3.

Transmission

Dry Lap

  • Differential On Throttle: 70%
  • Differential Off Throttle: 65%

Wet Lap


  • Differential On Throttle: 70%
  • Differential Off Throttle: 65%

While the current Formula One tyres allow for one-stop races at most venues, including Spa, the Belgian Grand Prix is still one of the harsher tracks on tyres. As recently as 2015, we saw a blowout for Sebastian Vettel and his Ferrari just a couple of laps from the end.

You can afford to open up the differential settings a little bit in the wet and the dry for Spa. The track doesn’t have many slow-speed corners, with La Source and the Bus Stop Chicane being the main two. This should help to keep the tyres in decent condition and allow for good traction in the longer corners.

Suspension Geometry

Dry Lap

  • Front Camber: 3.00
  • Rear Camber: 1.40
  • Front Toe: 0.11  
  • Rear Toe: 0.32

Wet Lap

  • Front Camber: 3.00
  • Rear Camber: 1.40
  • Front Toe: 0.10  
  • Rear Toe: 0.35

It is tempting to go all the way to the left and right with the front and rear camber, but going too aggressive either way will just see you chew up the tyres – especially if you haven’t offset tyre wear in other areas of the car.

You do, of course, want as much grip as possible in the corners, given that some of Spa’s corners are rather long. Should you lose that grip, you’ll probably end up connecting with the barriers.

You can certainly get away with smaller toe values, though, which will assist you in the longer corners that the track has, particularly Pouhon and Blanchimont. These are very long and sustained corners, are two of the most important on the circuit, and are two of the riskiest in wet conditions.

Suspension

Dry Lap

  • Front Suspension: 6
  • Rear Suspension: 6
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 5
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 5
  • Front Ride Height: 3
  • Rear Ride Height: 7

Wet Lap

  • Front Suspension: 6
  • Rear Suspension: 6
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 5
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 5
  • Front Ride Height: 4
  • Rear Ride Height: 7

Get that ride height as low as possible to maximise your straight-line speed in Sectors 1 and 3: it is, after all, what Spa is all about. If your straight-line speed isn’t up to the job, you are going to be overtaken pretty easily at the Belgian GP.

You can certainly afford to be more aggressive and firmer with your suspension settings at Spa, giving good stability in the longer corners. Having a slightly softer anti-roll bar setup will further assist your drive in the prolonged corners. Any lack of initial responsiveness could be amended with another turn of the front wing, if that is what you need.

Brakes

Dry Lap

  • Brake Pressure: 100%
  • Front Brake Bias: 54%

Wet Lap

  • Brake Pressure: 100%
  • Front Brake Bias: 57%

Keep that braking pressure at 100 per cent for both the wet and the dry, but definitely play around with the brake bias a little bit in the wet.

The fronts locking up is probably your biggest worry in the dry, but it might flip around to being the rear tires when it comes to the wet weather. So, take it nice and easy and adjust accordingly to keep your car stable.

Tyres

Dry Lap

  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 23.4 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 23.4  psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 21.9 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 21.9 psi

Wet Lap

  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 23.0 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 23.0 psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 21.5 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 21.5 psi

You’ll want to crank those tyre pressures up as much as you possibly dare at the Belgian GP in F1 2021, to reduce that rolling resistance and eke out just a little bit more straight-line speed. Hopefully, the rest of the setup will help with any increase in tyre temperatures and not wear out the tyres.

For the wet, ease the tyre pressures back a little bit. The wet and intermediate tyres will be in for a bit of a rough ride around this track, and it is very easy to spin up those rear wheels in damp conditions.

The Belgian Grand Prix is the longest on the F1 calendar, and it is quite possible that it could rain on one side of the circuit while being dry on another part. Get it wrong, and Spa will certainly punish you, but get it right, and you’ll enjoy one of the most rewarding driving experiences that you can find in F1 2021.

Have you got a Belgian Grand Prix setup? Let us know in the comments below!

Looking for more setup guides?

F1 2021: Mexican GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Austrian GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Brazilian GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: United States Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Abu Dhabi GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Russian GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Japanese GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Hungarian GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Singapore GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Italian GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: British GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Chinese GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Azerbaijan (Baku) GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Monaco GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Australian GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Bahrain GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: Spanish GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021: French GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

F1 2021 Setups and Settings Explained: Everything You Need Know about Differentials, Downforce, Brakes, and More

Exclusive Deals Newsletter

Subscribe to our newsletter for all the latest gaming deals and exclusive offers.


Henry K

Keen player of both simulation and racing games. Can mostly be found playing the F1 series, Train Simulator, Assetto Corsa, with a bit of Battlefield thrown in between.
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
Our privacy policy
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments