F1 22 Brazil Setup: Interlagos Wet and Dry Guide

We've got the best F1 22 Brazil setup for dry and wet laps in Career Mode, My Team & Online.


The Brazilian GP circuit is one of the most popular on the Formula One calendar; Interlagos always produces some incredible racing and rightfully deserves such adoration.

This is our setup guide to getting the most from your car at this iconic venue.


Check out the complete F1 22 setups guide if you’d like to know more about each adjustable component.

These are the recommended settings for the best F1 22 Brazil setup for dry and wet laps.

Best F1 22 Brazil setup

Use these car settings for the best setup in Brazil:

  • Front Wing Aero: 15
  • Rear Wing Aero: 25
  • DT On Throttle: 60%
  • DT Off Throttle: 50%
  • Front Camber: -2.50
  • Rear Camber: -1.00
  • Front Toe: 0.05
  • Rear Toe: 0.20
  • Front Suspension: 2
  • Rear Suspension: 4
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 2
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 4
  • Front Ride Height: 3
  • Rear Ride Height: 4
  • Brake Pressure: 100%
  • Front Brake Bias: 50%
  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 25 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 25 psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 23 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 23 psi
  • Tyre Strategy (25% race): Soft-Medium
  • Pit Window (25% race): 7-9 lap
  • Fuel (25% race): +1.5 laps

Best F1 22 Brazil setup (wet)

  • Front Wing Aero: 30
  • Rear Wing Aero: 45
  • DT On Throttle: 80%
  • DT Off Throttle: 60%
  • Front Camber: -2.50
  • Rear Camber: -2.00
  • Front Toe: 0.05
  • Rear Toe: 0.20
  • Front Suspension: 2
  • Rear Suspension: 6
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 2
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 3
  • Front Ride Height: 4
  • Rear Ride Height: 6
  • Brake Pressure: 100%
  • Front Brake Bias: 50%
  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 23 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 23 psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 23 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 23 psi
  • Tyre Strategy (25% race): Soft-Medium
  • Pit Window (25% race): 7-9 lap
  • Fuel (25% race): +1.5 laps

Aerodynamics setup


You are probably looking at our wing levels and wondering why they’re both the same. Well, the truth is that you need a bit of downforce in Brazil. Most of this track requires downforce, even if a bit of power is lost down the straights.

Sector 2 might not be the best place for overtaking, but you won’t get close to anyone to try an overtake unless you have the proper aero levels in the first place. In the end, you’ll find that a balanced aero setup works very well around this circuit in F1 22.

Transmission setup


Brazil is a mix of fast, slow, and medium-speed corners, but there are more slow-to-medium-speed corners than high-speed corners. Our transmission setup reflects this a bit, but we have slightly tweaked the off-throttle settings for the wet to compensate for those slippery conditions.

It is absolutely vital that you get the right levels of traction in the middle section, or you will either spin up the rears and swing around or just not have the out-and-out grip needed from the track’s surface.

Suspension geometry setup

You want a car in Brazil that will get through the corners cleanly and not eat up the tyres. We could arguably go much more aggressive with some of the setup figures in this part of the car, but as can be seen in real life, Interlagos can be an absolute killer when it comes to the tyres. So, the last thing that you want to do is play chicken with them, making it best to be more conservative with these setup components in F1 22.

Suspension setup

Suspension is a part of the setup that is a bit more down to you, the driver, rather than the track itself. Some prefer a car with a bit of understeer, while others want lots to wrangle? It’s really quite tricky to judge what is best, but we think that our softer setup gives a nicely balanced car on a track that is quite tricky.

Given some of the kerbs, the ride height that we have got should allow you to attack them quite nicely and not spin around. Just be careful on those kerbs in the Senna Esses and penultimate corner.

Brakes setup

This is the preferred brake pressure is 100% and 50% front brake bias setup for most racing in F1 22. It helps to stave off the main issue, lock-ups, while giving you ample control when competing in the Brazilian Grand Prix.

Tyres setup

Whilst we have increased tyre pressures for Brazil, we haven’t gone quite as high as you could get away with in F1 22. You can risk the tyre temperatures going through the roof or just play it safe. For us, we’d rather take the safe route as it just isn’t worth the potential disadvantage when it comes to tyre wear.

So, that’s everything that you need to know to get the most out of your car setup at the Brazilian GP in F1 22.

Have you got your own Brazilian Grand Prix setup? Share it with us in the comments below!

Looking for more F1 22 setups?

F1 22: Spa (Belgium) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Japan (Suzuka) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap)

F1 22: USA (Austin) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap)

F1 22 Singapore (Marina Bay) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Abu Dhabi (Yas Marina) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Hungary (Hungaroring) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Mexico Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Jeddah (Saudi Arabia) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Monza (Italy) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Australia (Melbourne) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Imola (Emilia Romagna) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Bahrain Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Monaco Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Baku (Azerbaijan) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Austria Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Spain (Barcelona) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: France (Paul Ricard) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Canada Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22 Game Setups and Settings Explained: Everything You Need Know about Differentials, Downforce, Brakes, and More


Henry K

Keen player of both simulation and racing games. Can mostly be found playing the F1 series, Train Simulator, Assetto Corsa, with a bit of Battlefield thrown in between.
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
Our privacy policy
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments