F1 2021: British GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

Check out this guide for the best F1 2021 Silverstone Circuit (Britain) dry and wet lap setup in Career Mode, My Team & Race.


For Formula One, Silverstone is home: the venue that, of course, hosts the British Grand Prix. The track has enthralled us over the years with some truly mesmerising races, and 2021 served up something quite controversial as well.

It’s one of the fastest and toughest circuits on the calendar, demanding plenty of commitment from the drivers and providing one of the greatest thrills of all of racing with Copse, Maggots, and Becketts.


To help you take on the legendary track, this is our setup guide to the British Grand Prix in F1 2021.

If the F1 2021 setup components are a bit confusing to you, check out our Complete F1 2021 Setups Guide for tips and explanations for each part of the setup.

Best F1 2021 Britain Setup (Wet and Dry)

ComponentDry Lap SetupWet Lap Setup
Front Wing Aero88
Rear Wing Aero66
DT On Throttle0.900.90
DT Off Throttle0.650.70
Front Camber-3.00°-3.00°
Rear Camber-1.40°-1.50°
Front Toe0.10°0.10°
Rear Toe0.35°0.35°
Front Suspension55
Rear Suspension33
Front Anti-Roll Bar55
Rear Anti-Roll Bar53
Front Ride Height44
Rear Ride Height78
Brake Pressure100.0100.0
Front Brake Bias0.540.55
Front Right Tyre Pressure22.6 psi23.0 psi
Front Left Tyre Pressure22.6 psi23.0 psi
Rear Right Tyre Pressure21.5 psi21.5 psi
Rear Left Tyre Pressure21.5 psi21.5 psi

F1 2021 British GP Setup Tips (Wet and Dry)

Aerodynamics

Dry Lap

  • Front Wing Aero: 8
  • Rear Wing Aero: 6

Wet Lap


  • Front Wing Aero: 8
  • Rear Wing Aero: 6

Silverstone might be a track that demands a high power output due to its lengthy straights, but you aren’t going to get around this place quickly without a huge amount of downforce.

Copse, Maggots and Becketts are just three of the corners where you need plenty of grip, both in the wet and the dry, and the Village complex just after Turn 1 at Abbey demands lots of low-speed grip. So, don’t be afraid to crank up the downforce levels at Silverstone.

Transmission

Dry Lap


  • Differential On Throttle: 90%
  • Differential Off Throttle:65%

Wet Lap

  • Differential On Throttle: 90%
  • Differential Off Throttle: 70%

Silverstone is tough on tyres, particularly if the British summer provides the heat that it has for the past two events at the circuit. The 70th Anniversary Grand Prix in 2020 showed just how tough the heat can be on tyres, and the British Grand Prix of that year saw a spate of tyre failures.

A balance of a more open on-throttle differential and more closed off-throttle should keep your tyres in good condition, but give you all of the traction that you need in the fast corners, whilst still offering good levels of grip when things get a bit slower.

Suspension Geometry

Dry Lap

  • Front Camber: 3.00
  • Rear Camber: 1.40
  • Front Toe: 0.10
  • Rear Toe: 0.35

Wet Lap

  • Front Camber: 3.00
  • Rear Camber: 1.50
  • Front Toe: 0.10  
  • Rear Toe: 0.35

There are a lot of sustained corners at Silverstone. By that, we mean there’re corners that go on for a long time, such as the Luffield Complex, Stowe Corner, and the Village section. You don’t want to add too much negative camber and kill the tyres, but definitely think about adding some more in the wet and the dry, just to help in those longer corners.

Think about slightly smaller toe in and out values as well to aid in the fast-sweeping Maggots and Becketts, as well as some of the more sustained corners. Get it just slightly wrong in some of Silverstone’s fast corners, and you will just bleed lap time – such is the nature of this incredible circuit.

Suspension

Dry Lap

  • Front Suspension: 5
  • Rear Suspension: 3
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 5
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 5
  • Front Ride Height: 4
  • Rear Ride Height: 7

Wet Lap

  • Front Suspension: 5
  • Rear Suspension: 3
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 5
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 3
  • Front Ride Height: 4
  • Rear Ride Height: 8

Ride height is crucial in F1 2021, perhaps more so now than in any other F1 game. Whilst at a lot of the tracks, you can get away with lower values, you need higher ones at Silverstone to avoid the car bottoming out through corners, pitching the car into the spin, and ultimately going into the barriers.

Balancing the springs and anti-roll bar settings will be crucial, too, because you need the car to be as stable as possible so that you can really attack some of the kerbs in the faster parts of the track. If you don’t get this right, you will soon know just how tough Silverstone is to tame.

Brakes

Dry Lap

  • Brake Pressure: 100%
  • Front Brake Bias: 54%

Wet Lap

  • Brake Pressure: 100%
  • Front Brake Bias: 55%

Keep the braking pressure at 100 per cent for both the wet and the dry at Silverstone. Most of the British GP in F1 2021 is at full throttle, and there aren’t too many harsh and aggressive braking zones on the circuit. So, just play around with the brake bias to find the best setting for your driving style.

Tyres

Dry Lap

  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 22.6 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 22.6  psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 21.5 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 21.5 psi

Wet Lap

  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 23.0 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 23.0 psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 21.5 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 21.5 psi

While some advantage in a straight line can be gained at Silverstone with the tyre pressures, go too high, and you will see wildly increased tyre temperatures that, if uncontrolled, will see them chewed up. This applies both in the wet and the dry.

That said, slightly higher tyre pressures in the wet shouldn’t hurt too much. You will be going much, much slower in some of the fast corners, so it could well be something that you don’t need to worry about.

Any race around Silverstone is a blast, with the track offering up one of the most challenging and rewarding driving experiences in F1 2021. Be mindful of the tyres, in particular, at the British GP as it is so, so easy to overdo it and cook them to the point that an extra pit stop could be in order.

Have you got your own British Grand Prix setup? Share it with us in the comments below!

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Henry K

Keen player of both simulation and racing games. Can mostly be found playing the F1 series, Train Simulator, Assetto Corsa, with a bit of Battlefield thrown in between.
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