F1 22: Hungary (Hungaroring) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

We've got the best F1 22 Hungaroring (Hungary) dry and wet lap setup in Career Mode, My Team & Online.


This year’s edition of the Hungarian Grand Prix staged one of the most exciting races of the entire season. First lap chaos saw Esteban Ocon take a memorable first win, with Sebastian Vettel finishing in second place.

The Hungaroring might be hard to overtake on, but it’s an old school track, with the twisty Sector 2 being a real test of your car’s downforce and grip. So, to help you navigate the Mogyoród track, here’s our setup guide for the Hungarian Grand Prix on F1 22.


Refer to our complete F1 22 setups guide if you’d like to know more about each setup component that you can tweak in the game.

These are the best wet and dry setups for the Hungaroring.

F1 22 Hungary (Hungaroring) setup

  • Front Wing Aero: 50
  • Rear Wing Aero: 50
  • DT On Throttle: 50%
  • DT Off Throttle: 52%
  • Front Camber: -2.50
  • Rear Camber: -2.00
  • Front Toe: 0.05
  • Rear Toe: 0.20
  • Front Suspension: 10
  • Rear Suspension: 1
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 10
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 1
  • Front Ride Height: 3
  • Rear Ride Height: 3
  • Brake Pressure: 100%
  • Front Brake Bias: 50%
  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 24.5 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 24.5 psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 22.5 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 22.5 psi
  • Tyre Strategy (25% race): Soft-Medium
  • Pit Window (25% race): 6-7 lap
  • Fuel (25% race): +1.4 laps

F1 22 Hungary (Hungaroring) setup (wet)

  • Front Wing Aero: 50
  • Rear Wing Aero: 50
  • DT On Throttle: 80%
  • DT Off Throttle: 60%
  • Front Camber: -3.00
  • Rear Camber: -1.50
  • Front Toe: 0.01
  • Rear Toe: 0.44
  • Front Suspension: 10
  • Rear Suspension: 1
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 10
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 1
  • Front Ride Height: 3
  • Rear Ride Height: 3
  • Brake Pressure: 100%
  • Front Brake Bias: 54%
  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 23.2 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 23.2 psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 21.2 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 21.2 psi
  • Tyre Strategy (25% race): Soft-Medium
  • Pit Window (25% race): 6-7 lap
  • Fuel (25% race): +1.4 laps

Aerodynamics setup

Hungary is certainly all about downforce and mechanical grip; without all of that, you aren’t going to be very fast around the Hungaroring. You need some straight-line speed down the finish straight and the shorter straight that follows it out of Turn 1.


You can certainly raise your wing levels at the front and rear to 50, but you can tweak the rear wing slightly lower for some more straight-line speed. Any loss of stability at the rear can be countered via the ride height, but crank it up a bit in the wet.

Transmission setup

Hungary is a tricky when it comes to transmission. There are several slow-speed and medium-speed corners, which means that you require good mechanical grip and traction out of them from the outset.


However, the Hungaroring is also quite brutal on tyres, and in a standard dry race, a second set of tyres can give you a massive pace advantage, as Lewis Hamilton showed us in 2019 and 2021.

Balance all of this out with a more open on-throttle setting with a more locked off-throttle setting for the car. Both of these settings can apply in the wet, when looking after the intermediates or wets and having that traction is more important.

Suspension geometry setup

We haven’t really gone for any extremes on either side when it comes to camber, partly due to the same reasoning behind our stance of being careful with your differential and transmission settings: tyre wear.

As you know, extra camber can seriously hinder your tyre wear, even though it does allow for extra grip in sustained cornering situations. The thing is, though, that there aren’t really any sustained corners in Hungary, except for the long right-hander that is the last corner.

As you want a stable car, you don’t want a significant amount of toe at the front or rear. So, we’ve kept things quite balanced and neutral. In the wet, it’s not a bad idea to add more toe in and toe out, but you can probably get away with the same camber settings. Of course, you can adjust it from our dry settings if you desire.

Suspension setup

We have certainly gone quite aggressive on the suspension for the Hungarian Grand Prix. We run with much stiffer suspension at the front than the back, balancing out the need for a solid ride over the kerbs and good aerodynamic stability.

If there is to be any stability, it will come from the rear – hence the lower rear suspension levels. A similar rule applies to the anti-roll bar settings: a firmer setup at the front is used to reduce the body, and it’s a bit softer at the rear for better traction.

Ride height-wise, while we are going to see increased levels of drag, the values that we have set will keep your car stable over bumps and kerbs.

As a general rule across our setups, if you need some additional stability over kerbs and bumps, crank the ride height up a bit, and you should be good to go. This seems to be the general consensus across the board on F1 22. Higher ride height values also help to keep the car stable in the wet.

Brakes setup

At most Grand Prix events in F1 22, you can offset the risk of a lock-up with a high brake pressure setting and just a few adjustments of the brake bias as a whole.

Tyres setup

With Hungary being so harsh on the tyres, it’s not a bad idea to keep a stable and neutral tyre pressure setup. In a Career Mode race, we found that with these settings, we could do the same stint lengths as the computer-controlled drivers, and in one instance, go a lap or two longer – and the car still felt great. You could even get away with a cheeky increase here, to 24.5 at the front, for example, for a little bit more straight-line speed.

The Hungarian Grand Prix takes place on a challenging track where errors will be punished. In the wet, it’s an incredibly tricky affair. For any wet running, our advice is to just be patient and keep it between the white lines. There is always the chance that a computer-controlled driver will make a mess at some point and create a safety car that might work to your advantage.

Have you got a setup for the Hungarian GP? Let us know in the comments below!

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Henry K

Keen player of both simulation and racing games. Can mostly be found playing the F1 series, Train Simulator, Assetto Corsa, with a bit of Battlefield thrown in between.
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