F1 22 Mexico Setup: Wet and Dry Guide

We've got the best F1 22 Mexico (Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez) dry and wet lap setup in Career Mode, My Team & Online.


After being absent from the Formula One calendar since the 1990s, the Mexican Grand Prix made a triumphant return in 2015. The circuit is always alive with passionate fans, most of which come to cheer on national hero Sergio Pérez.

The Mexican track is a tricky one to tame, and its high altitude and long straights result in Monza levels of downforce. Here, we’re going through the optimal setup guide for the Mexican GP in F1 22, helping you to master the Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez in wet and dry running.


To find out more about each F1 22 setup component, check out the complete F1 22 setups guide.

These are the best wet and dry setups for the Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez circuit.

F1 22 Mexico setup

Use these car settings for the best setup in Mexico:

  • Front Wing Aero: 6
  • Rear Wing Aero: 12
  • DT On Throttle: 50%
  • DT Off Throttle: 50%
  • Front Camber: -2.50
  • Rear Camber: -2.00
  • Front Toe: 0.05
  • Rear Toe: 0.20
  • Front Suspension: 3
  • Rear Suspension: 4
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 1
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 2
  • Front Ride Height: 3
  • Rear Ride Height: 6
  • Brake Pressure: 100%
  • Front Brake Bias: 50%
  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 25 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 25 psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 23 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 23 psi
  • Tyre Strategy (25% race): Soft-Medium
  • Pit Window (25% race): 5-7 lap
  • Fuel (25% race): +1.5 laps

F1 22 Mexico setup (wet)

  • Front Wing Aero: 30
  • Rear Wing Aero: 45
  • DT On Throttle: 50%
  • DT Off Throttle: 50%
  • Front Camber: -2.50
  • Rear Camber: -1.00
  • Front Toe: 0.05
  • Rear Toe: 0.20
  • Front Suspension: 2
  • Rear Suspension: 5
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 4
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 7
  • Front Ride Height: 2
  • Rear Ride Height: 7
  • Brake Pressure: 100%
  • Front Brake Bias: 50%
  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 23.7 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 23.7 psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 22.5 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 22.5 psi
  • Tyre Strategy (25% race): Soft-Medium
  • Pit Window (25% race): 5-7 lap
  • Fuel (25% race): +1.5 laps

Aerodynamics setup

Mexico’s a weird circuit for aerodynamics because you need plenty of downforce for Sectors 2 and 3, but the straights at the circuit lead to the best overtaking places at the venue. So, they simply can’t be ignored.


For that reason, we have a 6-12 setup in the dry as it provides stability and aerodynamic grip at the front and rear. This setup should allow you to get close enough to a car that DRS and a bit of overtake are sufficient to get past your rival. Crank the rear wing up a little bit in the wet for more stability.

Transmission setup

This might be the most aggressive setup that we’ve gone for when it comes to differential settings in F1 22. Mexico is a bit of a tyre killer, so you don’t want to be overstressing the rear tyres; nor do you want the car to be unsettled coming into the corners.


A 50% setup for your differential settings should look after the rear tires and allow for a nice level of rotation into the corners that keeps the car nicely settled as well.

Suspension geometry setup

Given the Esses in Mexico, we have gone for quite the aggressive front camber setup. You want a car that has strong grip in the sustained corners, but we have allowed some margin for error if things need adjusting, and it is always best to play things a little bit safer than you perhaps originally intended.

We have balanced it out slightly with the rear camber, being sure not to go too aggressive there, but you can afford to go a touch more aggressive in the wet for more stability.

We have cranked the values up for the toe as well, so that we get a nice, sharp turn-in response when we get into the corners. This setting t has been tweaked a little bit for the wet too, so as to increase the overall stability of the car.

Suspension setup

Whilst there aren’t many bumps at the Mexican GP in F1 22, there are lots of quick changes of direction through the twister corners and the fast Esses in the middle of the circuit. The last thing that you want is to have a car that’s unsettled and that spins out in those sections.

The recommended suspension values for this track can be tweaked if you find yourself lagging behind your rivals or the AI a little bit, but they should work quite well in the wet.

The ride height is pretty standard, for the most part, in an effort to avoid the car clouting the kerbs and being spun around without warning. It is quite easy to do this in Mexico due to the levels of grip needed and how violent some of the kerbs seem to be in F1 22.

Brakes setup

In F1 22, as you can offset the risk of a lock-up with a high brake pressure and a few adjustments to the brake bias, it’s best to go all-in for the brake pressure setup and just over a midway bias for the front brakes.

Tyres setup

As long as you aren’t overheating the tyres around Mexico, you will be safe when it comes to tyre pressures. The last thing that you want to be doing is stretching a set of tyres out to try to make them last, or even worse, making an extra pit stop because your tyres have been overcooked.

It is really easy to fall foul of this at the Mexican GP, so feel free to fine-tune your tyre pressure settings for both the wet and the dry. You can afford to run them higher in the wet to grab some straight-line speed.

The Mexican GP in F1 22 seems to divide opinions, but hopefully, our setup will allow you to go as fast as possible around the Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez.

Have you got your own Mexican Grand Prix setup? Let us know in the comments below!

Looking for more F1 22 setups?

F1 22: Spa (Belgium) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Japan (Suzuka) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap)

F1 22: USA (Austin) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap)

F1 22 Singapore (Marina Bay) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Abu Dhabi (Yas Marina) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Brazil (Interlagos) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap)

F1 22: Hungary (Hungaroring) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Jeddah (Saudi Arabia) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Monza (Italy) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Australia (Melbourne) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Imola (Emilia Romagna) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Bahrain Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Monaco Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Baku (Azerbaijan) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Austria Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Spain (Barcelona) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: France (Paul Ricard) Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22: Canada Setup Guide (Wet and Dry)

F1 22 Game Setups and Settings Explained: Everything You Need Know about Differentials, Downforce, Brakes, and More


Henry K

Keen player of both simulation and racing games. Can mostly be found playing the F1 series, Train Simulator, Assetto Corsa, with a bit of Battlefield thrown in between.
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
Our privacy policy
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments