F1 2021: Singapore GP Setup Guide (Wet and Dry Lap) and Tips

Check out this guide for the best F1 2021 Marina Bay Street Circuit (Singapore) dry and wet lap setup in Career Mode, My Team & Race.


Since it arrived on the calendar in 2008, Singapore has gained a reputation as possibly the most challenging track on the Formula One schedule. The vast heat levels experienced by the drivers, mechanics, and other team members make this an incredibly gruelling affair that pushes everything to the absolute limit.

It’s a very tricky track to master in-game as well. As with our Bahrain setup, we will be focussing a lot more on the dry aspects in this guide. While the 2017 Singapore Grand Prix started wet, it didn’t stay that way throughout the race, and it’s always unlikely that it will rain. So, without further ado, here is our setup guide to the Singapore Grand Prix in F1 2021.


If you want to learn the purpose and use of each F1 2021 setup component, check out the Complete F1 2021 Setups Guide.

Best F1 2021 Singapore Setup (Wet and Dry)

ComponentDry Lap SetupWet Lap Setup
Front Wing Aero99
Rear Wing Aero1111
DT On Throttle0.700.70
DT Off Throttle0.600.60
Front Camber-2.50°-2.50°
Rear Camber-1.50°-1.50°
Front Toe0.06°0.06°
Rear Toe0.20°0.20°
Front Suspension33
Rear Suspension33
Front Anti-Roll Bar44
Rear Anti-Roll Bar44
Front Ride Height44
Rear Ride Height88
Brake Pressure100.0100.0
Front Brake Bias0.540.55
Front Right Tyre Pressure22.6 psi22.6 psi
Front Left Tyre Pressure22.6 psi22.6 psi
Rear Right Tyre Pressure21.5 psi21.5 psi
Rear Left Tyre Pressure21.5 psi21.5 psi

F1 2021 Singapore GP Setup Tips (Wet and Dry)

Aerodynamics

Dry Lap

  • Front Wing Aero: 9
  • Rear Wing Aero: 11

Wet Lap

  • Front Wing Aero: 4           
  • Rear Wing Aero: 5

Being pretty much all about downforce and low-speed grip around Singapore, you aren’t going to worry too much, if at all, about straight-line speed.


While the long back-straight does provide the best chance of overtaking – if you are close enough to use DRS and overtake mode – you should still be able to make a move stick, potentially around the outside, too. You can crank the front wing down slightly, though, to ease that straight-line speed up just a little bit.

Transmission

Dry Lap

  • Differential On Throttle: 70%
  • Differential Off Throttle:60%

Wet Lap


  • Differential On Throttle: 70%
  • Differential Off Throttle: 60%

Unsurprisingly, you are probably going to feel that a more locked differential setup is the best way to go around the Marina Bay Street Circuit. It’s simply a case that there is a multitude of traction zones at the Singapore GP.

Pretty much every corner in Singapore is a slow-speed affair. So, bring those on and off throttle differential values as far down as you dare, but allow some margin and leeway in case the absolute lowest levels are a little bit too extreme.  

Suspension Geometry

Dry Lap

  • Front Camber: -2.50
  • Rear Camber: -1.50
  • Front Toe: 0.06
  • Rear Toe: 0.20

Wet Lap

  • Front Camber: -2.50
  • Rear Camber: -1.50
  • Front Toe: 0.06  
  • Rear Toe: 0.20

The only real extreme that we are dealing with here, when it comes to camber and toe, is the front camber. Given that you need plenty of grip out of the corners, you can go all of the way along for the front camber to get as much rear grip down as possible.

The Singapore Grand Prix’s track is all about getting the most contact out of the tyres as you can for the best traction and best grip. You can go pretty aggressive on the toe setup, too: again, to get the ultimate traction possible. This also applies if you find yourself driving in a rare wet race in Singapore.

Suspension

Dry Lap

  • Front Suspension: 3
  • Rear Suspension: 3
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 4
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 4
  • Front Ride Height: 4
  • Rear Ride Height: 8

Wet Lap

  • Front Suspension: 3
  • Rear Suspension: 3
  • Front Anti-Roll Bar: 4
  • Rear Anti-Roll Bar: 4
  • Front Ride Height: 4
  • Rear Ride Height: 8

We’ve gone quite aggressive with our front suspension and anti-roll bar setups, but first of all, let’s take a look at the ride height.

We found that by having the ride height quite high, you will get a stable and predictable car over the bumps and kerbs in Singapore, which is one of the worst tracks on the calendar for high kerbs and lots of surface bumps. Keep the rear ride height more elevated than the front, though, as you can offset the increased drag from the rear ride height with a slightly lower front ride height value.

You can play with the suspension and anti-roll bar settings a bit as well, perhaps bringing the suspension more to the softer side to avoid some of the bumps around the track. There isn’t any really harsh acceleration at this track, with it all needing to be quite gradual to avoid spinning up those rear tyres.

The Singapore GP tends to follow the traditional state of play for street circuits in F1 2021 in that it usually offers rather low grip.

Brakes

Dry Lap

  • Brake Pressure: 100%
  • Front Brake Bias: 54%

Wet Lap

  • Brake Pressure: 100%
  • Front Brake Bias: 55%

You really need a lot of stopping power at the Marina Bay Street Circuit. Again, this is for the dry laps and those very rare wet laps. It’s up to you as to how you set your brake bias, with it best to base the setup on your gameplay preferences.

Tyres

Dry Lap

  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 22.6 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 22.6  psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 21.5 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 21.5 psi

Wet Lap

  • Front Right Tyre Pressure: 22.6 psi
  • Front Left Tyre Pressure: 22.6  psi
  • Rear Right Tyre Pressure: 21.5 psi
  • Rear Left Tyre Pressure: 21.5 psi

Singapore is quite harsh on the tyres due to the nature of the track and the extreme heat. We know that increased tyre temperatures are a consequence of higher tyre pressures, so bring those values down across the front and the rear to keep them cooled down by a fraction.

While increased tyre pressures can help with straight-line speed, the risks associated with that and the rise in tyre wear isn’t worth taking.

Formula One’s Singapore GP will not take its place this year, being replaced by the Turkish Grand Prix, but it is still available for us to enjoy in F1 2021. It’s one of the toughest venues on the calendar, so be sure to use the best setup to give yourself the best chance of coming out on top.

Have you got your own Singapore Grand Prix setup? Share it with us in the comments below!

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Henry K

Keen player of both simulation and racing games. Can mostly be found playing the F1 series, Train Simulator, Assetto Corsa, with a bit of Battlefield thrown in between.
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